balloon angioplasty


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Related to balloon angioplasty: Bypass surgery

angioplasty

 [an´je-o-plas″te]
an angiographic procedure for elimination of areas of narrowing in blood vessels.
balloon angioplasty angioplasty in which a balloon catheter is inflated inside an artery, stretching the intima and leaving a ragged interior surface after deflation, which triggers a healing response and breaking up of plaque.
percutaneous transluminal angioplasty a type of balloon angioplasty in which the catheter is inserted through the skin and through the lumen of the vessel to the site of the narrowing.
percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) percutaneous transluminal angioplasty to enlarge the lumen of a sclerotic coronary artery (see accompanying illustration). This provides an alternative to cardiac bypass surgery for selected patients with ischemic heart disease. See also heart.
 Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). A, Balloon-tipped catheter positioned in blocked artery. B, Balloon is centered. C, Balloon expands to (D) compress blockage. E, Artery diameter opened. From Polaski and Tatro, 1996.

balloon angioplasty

n.
A procedure in which a catheter with a tiny balloon at the tip is inserted into an artery that has been narrowed by the accumulation of fatty deposits, and the balloon is inflated to widen the arterial opening.

balloon angioplasty

A minimally invasive procedure in which a catheter with an inflatable balloon tip is inserted through the femoral or brachiocephalic artery and manoeuvred to a previously identified (by angiography) zone of arterial stenosis or occlusion. Once in place, the balloon is inflated, expanding the lumen of the stenosed vessel. BA is used primarily for coronary and carotid arteries, but may be used for other arteries.
 
Outcomes
Angioplasty successfully opens 90% of occluded coronary arteries; 40% of patients with successful angioplasty suffer recurrent stenosis at the site of balloon inflation.

balloon angioplasty

Cardiology A minimally invasive procedure in which a catheter with an inflatable balloon tip is inserted through the femoral or brachiocephalic artery and 'snaked' to a previously identified–by angiography zone of arterial stenosis or occlusion. See Atherosclerosis, Cholesterol, Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. Cf Stenting.

bal·loon ang·i·o·plas·ty

(bă-lūn' an'jē-ō-plas'tē)
Dilation of an obstructed atherosclerotic artery by passage of a balloon catheter through the vessel to the area of disease where the plaque is compressed against the vessel wall.

balloon angioplasty

The use of a BALLOON CATHETER to restore more normal width to an artery narrowed by ATHEROSCLEROSIS. The catheter is threaded along the artery to the site of the narrowing and the balloon is then inflated, crushing the atherosclerotic plaque into the wall.

Balloon angioplasty

The use of a balloon attached to a catheter to widen an artery that has become narrowed. As the balloon is inflated, it opens the artery.
References in periodicals archive ?
Three of 5 recurred patients underwent additional treatment, one patient with stent insertion and two with additional balloon angioplasty. One patient who underwent an additional balloon angioplasty was suspected of recurrence but had no other symptoms (Fig.
Clinical success, as recorded in follow-up, was defined as one or more following: (1) resolution of stenosis and avoidance of surgical intervention; (2) optimization of future surgical intervention, as judged by one of the two criteria: (a) pulmonary artery anatomy or pressure that became suitable for surgical repair in patients, who previously had pulmonary artery anatomies or pressures for which surgical repair was contraindicated; and (b) obviating the need for surgical intervention in the areas treated with balloon angioplasty during the succeeding surgical repair; and (3) alleviation of symptoms due to right heart dysfunction, improvement in oxygen saturation, or both.
By approximately 36 months after the drug-eluting balloon angioplasty only 3 patients were found to have recurrent in-stent restenosis at 18 25 and 32 months respectively after the initial angioplasty a far longer interval without restenosis than earlier treatments provided.
Geometric remodeling is not the principal pathogenetic process in restenosis after balloon angioplasty. Evidence from correlative angiographic-histomorphometric studies of atherosclerosis arteries in rabbits.
Thirty percent of patients undergoing balloon angioplasty had symptoms recur within six months.
To make this discovery, Conte and colleagues studied the effects of the compounds (resolvin or RvD) first in cultured vascular cells taken from patients who had undergone bypass operations, and then in rabbits who were treated with a balloon angioplasty procedure in the arteries of the hind limb.
While balloon angioplasty and stenting of the coronary and carotid arteries with a variety of stent types is widely successful, transferring this success to the femoral and popliteal arteries has proven to be complicated.
In this context, the transluminal balloon angioplasty of lower extremity arteries in patients with diabetes mellitus is gaining popularity (Zufarov, Karimov, Saatov, and Salakhitdinov, 2003; Kaputin, Ovcharenko, and Bregovskiy, 2008; Shipovskiy, Zolkin, and Magomedov, 2008 2008; Levin and Neal, 1988).
Depending on the severity of the condition, it can be managed with blood pressure drugs, antiplatelet medication to diminish risk of blood clots, balloon angioplasty or stenting to open up blood flow within the artery, and surgery to treat aneurysms.
Drug-eluting stents can help reduce the occurrence of restenosis after balloon angioplasty and the placement of stents.
The Charger PTA Balloon Catheter is designed for post-stent dilatation as well as conventional balloon angioplasty to open blocked peripheral arteries.