ballistics

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The science of the motion of projectiles in flight and the dynamics of deceleration as the projectile impacts on the body or tissues; the energy imparted to tissue is calculated as E = mv2; m = mass; v = velocity

ballistics

(bă-lĭs′tĭks) [Gr. ballein, to throw]
The science of the motion and trajectory of projectiles, including bullets, bombs, rockets, and guided missiles.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Ballistician Emil Praslick, taking wind readings.
Possibly, according to him (ballistician) malayo na ang pinanggalingan ng bullet na tumama sa sasakyan,' Balmes said.
"Jim" Hull, who for years has been chief ballistician at Sierra, and we wish him a long and happy retirement.
Hornady's ballistician that led those efforts was none other than Guns & Ammo contributor Dave Emary.
I read April's "The Ballistician" column by Allan Jones about the .303 British cartridge and must disagree with one of his statements regarding reloading the .303.
Ballistician Bill Falin did similar tests with the .35 Whelen.
He said a ballistician testified that 9 mm slugs were recovered from Real's body.
His experience includes extensive work as an interior and exterior ballistician, vulnerability/lethality tester and analyst, materials engineer, author and educator.
From a ballistician's standpoint, it is the increased velocity and in turn, increased down-range energy.
4 RIFLE, WITH ITS 100-ROUND DETACH able magazine that allows the shooter to top off with a ready rifle in hand, the cock on closing, the sights, and the lower recoil and noise but entirely adequate round, is the best bolt rifle of World War II, so I enjoyed Allan Jones's April "The Ballistician" column on the .303 British round.
After dinner, the ballistician who'd developed the ammo explained that killing flying birds with shotguns is purely a matter of applied foot-pounds of energy, the reason the loads we'd test contained a relatively small amount of relatively large, extra-dense, super-hard shot.
I always felt like a biologist during my career as a ballistician, capturing something for study in the lab.