balance

(redirected from balanced)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

balance

 [bal´ans]
an instrument for weighing.
equilibrium (def. 1).
acid-base balance see acid-base balance.
analytical balance a balance used in the laboratory, sensitive to variations of the order of 0.05 to 0.1 mg.
fluid balance see fluid balance.
negative balance a state in which the amount of water or an electrolyte excreted from the body is greater than that ingested.
nitrogen balance see nitrogen balance.
positive balance a state in which the amount of water or an electrolyte excreted from the body is less than that ingested.
water balance fluid balance.
zero balance a state in which the amount of water or an electrolyte excreted from the body is exactly equal to that ingested; see equilibrium (def. 1).

bal·ance

(bal'ants),
1. An apparatus for weighing (for example, scales).
See also: equilibrium.
2. The normal state of action and reaction between two or more parts or organs of the body.
See also: equilibrium.
3. Quantities, concentrations, and proportionate amounts of bodily constituents.
See also: equilibrium.
4. The difference between intake and use, storage, or excretion of a substance by the body.
See also: equilibrium.
5. The act of maintaining an upright posture in standing or locomotion.
6. The system that depends on vestibular function, vision, and proprioception to maintain posture, navigate in one's surroundings, coordinate motion of body parts, modulate fine motor control, and initiate the vestibulooculomotor reflexes.
[L. bi-, twice, + lanx, dish, scale]

balance

Lab medicine
A scale which uses counterbalancing weights.
 
Neurology
Equilibrium, see there.
 
Physiology
Homeostasis, see there.

balance

Neurology Equilibrium, see there Physiology Homeostasis. See Fat balance, Health balance, Nitrogen balance, Water balance.

bal·ance

(bal'ăns)
1. An apparatus for weighing (e.g., scales).
2. The normal state of action and reaction between two or more parts or organs of the body.
3. Normal quantities, concentrations, and proportionate amounts of bodily constituents.
4. The difference between intake and use, storage, or excretion of a substance by the body.
See also: equilibrium
5. The act of maintaining an upright posture in standing or locomotion.
6. The system that depends on vestibular function, vision, and proprioception to maintain posture, navigate in one's surroundings, coordinate motion of body parts, modulate fine motor control, and initiate the vestibulo-oculomotor reflexes.
[L. bi-, twice, + lanx, dish, scale]

balance

the maintenance of stability and specific orientation by an organism in relation to the immediate environment. Organs of balance occur at the end of each SEMICIRCULAR CANAL in the inner ear where there is a swelling, an AMPULLA; this is a RECEPTOR which has a group of sensory cells, the CRISTA AMPULLARIS, hairs from which are embedded in a gelatinous cap - the CUPULA. Since the semicircular canals are at right angles to each other the ampullae are sensitive to movement in any plane, as the canal fluid moves the cupula in a direction opposite to that of the movement of the head. Head position is given by receptors containing calcareous OTOLITHS in the UTRICLE and SACCULE, and these react to gravity in relation to the position of the head. Nerve fibres lead to the brain from ampullae, saccule and utricle.

bal·ance

(bal'ăns)
1. An apparatus for weighing (e.g., scales).
2. The normal state of action and reaction between two or more parts or organs of the body.
3. Quantities, concentrations, and proportionate amounts of bodily constituents.
4. The difference between intake and use, storage, or excretion of a substance by the body.
5. The act of maintaining an upright posture in standing or locomotion.
6. The system that depends on vestibular function, vision, and proprioception to maintain posture, navigate in one's surroundings, coordinate motion of body parts, modulate fine motor control, and initiate vestibulo reflexes.
[L. bi-, twice, + lanx, dish, scale]

Patient discussion about balance

Q. my friend recently told me that she throws up from time to time and it helps her balance her weight I told her I think that’s what bulimic girls do, but she insisted that it wasn’t something she can’t control or that comes after eating bursts (which she doesn’t have). It still seems wrong to me, but I would like to hear other’s opinions.

A. bolimic girls try to avoid eating. then they get so frustrated that they eat like crazy and then feel guilty and threw ups. it's a bad condition that needs to and can be treated.

Q. how do i deal with gaining weight ...? i mean really massive change in my weight balance ... sometimes it goes extremely up and sometimes i lose like 5 kilos a week .. what can it be ? i am 25 years old and i don't have health issues beside that ...

A. If this is occurring frequently you should go see a doctor about it. Do you have thyroid problems? Have you been sick a lot?

Q. HOW DO ENERGYS EFFECT THE BODY? POSITIVE, NEGITIVE, CHI, ELOPTIC, LIFE FORCE ENERGY.

A. Not really my area, but you can try and ask in the alternative medicine community (http://www.imedix.com/Alternative_Medicine).

You can read about these things here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pioneers_in_radionics, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%27i

More discussions about balance
References in periodicals archive ?
The study includes results from three different runner designs for the mold cavities shown in Figure 1: (1) ladder runner (or fishbone runner), (2) geometrically balanced runner, and (3) Theologically balanced runner.
The reason Joe Hart is reluctant to call his nearly flammable Syrah balanced, even though he thinks it's tasty, is because it doesn't fit the idea of Syrah he has in head, which is bone dry and much lower in alcohol.
"Given the way the concept of the balanced scorecard has evolved in practice, it is no wonder that many financial executives look on the concept as an expensive, bloated and useless substitute for the traditional paper reports.
For the IDC Balanced Rating, main memory peak bandwidth and the STREAM TRIAD benchmarks are used.
Although the author primarily focuses on the private sector, he also highlights the importance of using the balanced scorecard in the public sector.
Your arrangement must not only look balanced, it must be mechanically sound and stable.
Many members of the hard core of ideological Republicans in the House do not agree that either the financial realities or the "horror stories" justify a retreat from the goals of the Balanced Budget Act.
division of exploration and production of a large oil company, which has seen a 13 percent decline in income over the last five years, expects its recent Balanced Scorecard initiative to add $350 million to its bottom line over the next 10 years.
For health care providers, Veit predicts that one of the hardest decisions will be whether to take advantage of the Balanced Budget Act's provisions for PSO formation.
Balanced funds typically mandate that portfolio managers keep a set mix, say 60% of their overall investment in the stock market and 40% in bonds.
Both feel that being married has actually helped them become more balanced. `There was work and going out, but not much in between,' says Francis.
But in a rare display of bipartisanship last year--albeit one preceded by months of budget gridlock culminating in the mortifying spectacle of the multiple shutdown of the federal government--they did manage to grip and grin for the cameras on one issue: committing the United States federal government to a balanced budget by 2002.