BAD

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BAD

Drug slang
A regional term for crack cocaine.
 
Immunology
An acronym (background, aggregates, debris) for the noncellular material that must be “gated out” in flow cytometry.
 
Molecular biology
A Bcl-2 related protein which can induce apoptosis; it selectively heterodimerises with Bcl-XL and Bcl-2, which displaces Bax from Bcl-XL, resulting in cell death.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a nutshell, this objection to preferentism goes like this: I can certainly desire to be badly off. But if a desire-satisfaction theory of welfare is true, then--under certain assumptions--the hypothesis that I desire to be badly off entails a contradiction.
TUC general secretary Brendan Barber said: "It is depressing but perhaps not that surprising to learn the rich think they are poorer than they actually are, but we also find that people on really low wages don't appreciate just how badly off they are.''
Bangor, who had excelled in a 5-0 super show at high-flying Port Talbot Town just a week earlier, were badly off colour, whereas Aberystwyth looked the part from the kick-off.
We are just as badly off in 2004 and our fate has been ignored.
And eighth graders are just as badly off. "I couldn't think of a lot of reasons why I was against it in D.C.," he recalled.
Leeds are just as badly off and as far away from being a BIG CLUB as I am from being Pope.
The low-income families in the worst inner cities, in Watts or in Harlem: Are these as badly off with respect to food as they are with schools?
We're not badly off. He gets a reduced works pension, but it's supplemented by earnings from my part-time job.
While headship effects the material well-being of single, separated/divorced, and widowed mothers, mothers in a consensual union tend to be badly off materially even when they do not head their own household.
Rubin told members of a House Appropriations Subcommittee that the Internal Revenue Service modernization program was essential to better serve taxpayers and improve revenue collection and compliance, but he said he shared public concern that the project had gone badly off track.
Sweeney is right when he says that American workers have not been this badly off since the Depression.
They were not badly off and their inclusion in the second half brought change courtesy of their maturity,' he noted.