baculovirus

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bac·u·lo·vi·rus

(bak'yū-lō-vī'rŭs),
A virus that infects insect cells; used extensively in expression systems for recombinant proteins that require eukaryotic processing systems.
[L. baculum, rod, + virus]

baculovirus

(băk″ū-lō-vī′rŭs) [L. baculum, staff, walking stick + ″]
A double-stranded DNA virus that infects insects. It has been used experimentally in recombinant DNA technology, e.g., in manufacturing vaccines.
References in periodicals archive ?
Feeding behaviour of infected larvae determines the extent to which baculoviruses can protect crops against feeding damage (Hoover et al., 1995).
Specificity and safety of baculoviruses. In: The biology of baculoviruses.
The vesicles are probably formed with membranous material found in the ring zone as in baculoviruses. A viral nucleosome is also observed as a filamentous structure in the virogenic stroma.
Because baculoviruses evolved to infect insect cells, human cells don't recognize the promoter sequences within their genome, so those genes are not expressed and the virus can't replicate.
In sections on DNA viruses, RNA viruses, and current topics, they discuss such matters as entomopoxviruses, the biology and genetics of nudiviruses, the genomics and biology of iflavilruses, cypoviruses, the role of microRNAs as regulators of host-virus interactions, apoptosis and humeral responses as antiviral responses in insects, and the ecology of baculoviruses. The focus is on damage to commercially valuable insects, primarily bees and silkworms, rather than using viruses for insect pest control, or insects as vectors for viruses affecting humans or livestock.
In another approach, biotechnologists are studying baculoviruses, a large variety of viruses composed of double strands of DNA that act specifically on hundreds of arthropods, including many agricultural pests, but appear to be safe for plants and vertebrates.
Baculoviruses, a family of large rod-shaped viruses that typically infect insects, but do not replicate in vertebrate animal cells, are among the most promising.
We fused 2 different baculoviruses (wild-type and recombinant) plus 2 influenza A viruses with color-coded microparticles and performed multiplexed fluorescence-activated cell-sorting (FACS) [3] titrations with specific antibodies and sera, and compared the results with results from ELISA.
Previous studies have shown the usefulness of BEI as an effective inactivating agent for Baculoviruses. The goal of this study was to develop a method for the complete and rapid inactivation of a recombinant baculovirus (rBV) used in a veterinary vaccine.
Such baculoviruses can be used to efficiently deliver genes to mammalian cells or organisms, and such genes can be expressed either from the baculovirus genome, or integrated into the mammalian cell genome, and can be used for expression of proteins such that purification of secreted or other protein products does not require removal of contaminating baculovirus particles or baculovirus envelope proteins.
Baculoviruses are rod-shaped DNA viruses, many of which begin their life cycle reproducing inside cells.