bacteriology

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bacteriology

 [bak-te″re-ol´o-je]
the scientific study of bacteria. adj., adj bacteriolog´ic, bacteriolog´ical.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bac·te·ri·ol·o·gy

(bak-tēr'ē-ol'ŏ-jē),
The branch of science concerned with the study of bacteria.
[bacterio- + G. logos, study]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bacteriology

(băk-tîr′ē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The study of bacteria, especially in relation to medicine and agriculture.

bac·te′ri·o·log′ic (-ə-lŏj′ĭk), bac·te′ri·o·log′i·cal adj.
bac·te′ri·o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
bac·te′ri·ol′o·gist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

bac·te·ri·ol·o·gy

(bak-tēr'ē-ol'ŏ-jē)
The branch of science concerned with the study of bacteria.
[bacterio- + G. logos, study]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bacteriology

The scientific study of bacteria. Medical bacteriology is the study of organisms that can cause disease or which are normally present, harmlessly or beneficially, in the body.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

bacteriology

the study of BACTERIA.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

bac·te·ri·ol·o·gy

(bak-tēr'ē-ol'ŏ-jē)
The branch of science concerned with the study of bacteria.
[bacterio- + G. logos, study]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
For a century and a half, notions of objectivity among clinical physicians, physiologists, and bacteriologists branded as irrelevant the rival concepts of statisticians.
Similarly, when the initial devastating epidemics of polio became increasingly virulent after the turn of the century, bacteriologists attacked this new ailment with gusto, expecting to generate knowledge of the disease's transmission and eventually produce vaccines and anti-toxins, as had been done so dramatically with smallpox, rabies, whooping cough, typhoid, diphtheria and tetanus.
Other bacteriologists were identifying pathogenic microorganisms, too.
Parasitologists, virologists, and bacteriologists should agree on a consensus set of terms for the ecologic description of multihost systems.