bacterial STI

(redirected from bacterial sexually transmitted infection)

bacterial STI

Any sexually transmitted infection caused by bacteria, such as syphilis, gonorrhoea and chlamydia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gonorrhoea is a bacterial sexually transmitted infection and, untreated, can enter the bloodstream or spread to the joints.
(2-4) In developed countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom, CT is the most commonly diagnosed bacterial sexually transmitted infection (STI) among adolescents and young adults.
It is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infection in the UK.
The advent of 24-hour drinking and extending licensing laws will increase levels of sexually transmitted infections in Wales.: Worrying rise in sexually transmitted infections:Gonorrhoea is the second most common bacterial sexually transmitted infection in the United Kingdom with 22,335 infections diagnosed in GUM clinics in 2004.
Genital chlamydial infection has become the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infection; its relatively mild symptoms, higher screening and diagnostic costs, and longer course of therapy make chlamydia especially difficult to control.
They then repeated this analysis in people who did not have a bacterial sexually transmitted infection so that bacterial infection would not affect the results.
The most common treatment-emergent adverse events (>=25%; all grades) were bacterial sexually transmitted infections, including anal chlamydia infection, oropharyngeal gonococcal infection and rectal gonorrhea.
Using drugs during sex boosted the odds of condom-free anal sex with a detectable viral load, * hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, and bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in gay or bisexual men with HIV in England and Wales.1 Three in 10 men surveyed used drugs when having sex and 1 in 10 injected drugs when having sex.
Historically regarded as "curable," bacterial sexually transmitted infections such as chlamydia and gonorrhea were effectively treated with antibiotics; however, over the years STIs have evolved and acquired resistance to many antibiotic treatments, resulting in a depleted pool of therapeutic options available to treat these increasingly common infections.