bacterial enzyme


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bacterial enzyme

An enzyme produced by bacteria; many have specific, toxic effects on humans.
See also: enzyme
References in periodicals archive ?
The presumption follows that a similar approach targeting bacterial enzymes may counteract the efflux mechanism common in Gram-negative resistance.
Everything else on the antibiotic gives it useful properties, such as water solubility, resistance to metabolism (antibiotics would be no good if they were broken down in the intestines) and the ability to fit snugly into the active site of the bacterial enzyme it targets.
Unlike bleach and soap that destroy and dislodge germs, triclosan works by interfering with a specific bacterial enzyme, which not all bacteria have.
In the 1970s, the bacterial enzyme amylase replaced acid conversion in processing corn starch to glucose.
To make corn syrup commercially, instead of using an acid, a mixture of corn starch and water is treated first with alpha amylase, a bacterial enzyme that breaks the starch down into oligosaccharides, followed by the addition of gammaamylase, an enzyme isolated from the Aspergillus fungus that converts some of the oligosaccharides to glucose.
Fidaxomicin is the first in a new class of antibiotics called macrocycles, which inhibit the bacterial enzyme RNA polymerase, resulting in the death of C.
As early as the 1960s, researchers knew that the bacterial enzyme beta-glucoronidase converts a plant chemical called cycasin into a carcinogen.
It produces blue colonies on MI Blue under ambient light doe to the breakdown of IBDG by the bacterial enzyme [beta]-Glucurondase.
Sulfamethoxazole inhibits dihydropteroate synthase, the bacterial enzyme that catalyzes the incorporation of p-aminobenzoid acid into dihydropteroic acid, the immediate precursor of folic acid, while trimethoprim was specifically synthesized as an inhibitor of dihydrofolate-reductase (40).
The bacterial enzyme unwittingly acts as a device that hides the enemy, he says--perhaps even encouraging the bacteria to take in more of the toxic drug than they ordinarily would.