bacon

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Ba·con

(bā-kŏn),
Harry E., 20th-century U.S. proctologist. See: Bacon anoscope.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bacon

A cured meat from pigs and hogs, which usually has veins of white fat running through it.

Health effects
• Every 2 rashers/slices of bacon per day increases the risk of pancreatic cancer by 19% (based on a meta-analysis which pooled 11 studies involving 6000 patients).
• Increased risk of COPD, likely due to the sodium nitrite which is used as a preservative in pork products.
• Heart disease and diabetes—here linked to chemical preservatives
• Trichinosis—caused by Trichinella spiralis, a roundworm, the larvae of which encyst in muscle.

Processing
The first step involves soaking in brine or dry packing, followed by boiling or smoking.

BACON

A chemotherapy regimen for patients with inoperable non-small cell carcinoma of the lung, consisting of:
• Bleomycin;
• Adriamycin-doxorubicin;
• CCNU;
• Oncovin (vincristine); and
• Nitrogen mustard.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
At first Bacon did what he could for his friend, and it was through his help that Essex was set free.
It was then that Bacon had to choose between friend and Queen.
Among the learned counsel sat Bacon, a disappointed man of forty.
As the trial went on, however, Bacon spoke, not to save, but to condemn.
Perhaps Bacon could not have saved his friend from death, but had he used his wit to try at least to save instead of helping to condemn, he would have kept his own name from a dark blot.
To Bacon it seemed too small a reward for his betrayal of his friend, even although it had seemed to mean loyalty to his Queen.
Bacon's splendid mind and unique intellectual vision produced, perhaps inevitably, considering his public activity, only fragmentary concrete achievements.
They deal with a great variety of topics, whatever Bacon happened to be interested in, from friendship to the arrangement of a house, and in their condensation they are more like bare synopses than complete discussions.
With characteristic intellectual independence Bacon strikes out for himself an extremely terse and clear manner of expression, doubtless influenced by such Latin authors as Tacitus, which stands in marked contrast to the formless diffuseness or artificial elaborateness of most Elizabethan and Jacobean prose.
But Bacon's most important work, as we have already implied, was not in the field of pure literature but in the general advancement of knowledge, particularly knowledge of natural science; and of this great service we must speak briefly.
(The Great Renewal of Knowledge); but parts of this survey were necessarily to be left for posterity to formulate, and of the rest Bacon actually composed only a fraction.
In the details of all his scholarly work Bacon's knowledge and point of view were inevitably imperfect.