background retinopathy

background retinopathy

Nonproliferative retinopathy Ophthalmol-ogy Early stage of diabetic retinopathy; usually does not impair vision
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Unless treated, diabetic retinopathy can gradually become more serious and progress from 'background retinopathy' to seriously affecting vision and can lead to blindness.
Valk et al13 who observed a significant association between plasma Magnesium concentration and the development of background retinopathy but did not state the association with the severity of retinopathy.
found that patients with or without background retinopathy were at higher risk for developing vitreous hemorrhage [37].
Background retinopathy has no treatment but patients will need regular eye examinations, added.
Lipid profiles and blood pressure: are they risk factors for the development of early background retinopathy and incipient nephropathy in children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus?
Depending on the severity of DR, four stages can be distinguished in general: preretinopathy (R0), background retinopathy (R1), preproliferative retinopathy (R2), and active proliferative retinopathy (R3A) [13].
The retinopathy was graded into background retinopathy, preproliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy.
A nationwide retrospective analysis concerning chronic diabetic complications of inpatients during 1991-2000, initiated by Chinese Diabetes Society (CDS), suggested that 34.3% diabetic patients had ocular disease (including cataract, background retinopathy, proliferative retinopathy, and blindness), of which 20.5% in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and 35.7% in type 2 diabetes (T2D).
"So patients who had no retinopathy in either eye were at lowest risk, patients with background retinopathy in one eye had about a doubling of risk, and patients with background retinopathy in both eyes were at a much higher level of risk."
It is reported that almost all patients develop background retinopathy with time, and 40-50% progress to proliferative retinopathy within 25 years of diabetes onset [2].
Kitzmiller and his colleagues reported that 3 out of 10 lispro-treated patients with no detected background retinopathy progressed to proliferative retinopathy during pregnancy (Diabetes Care 1999;22:874-5), Dr.
Accordingly, patients were divided into three groups as the first group without retinopathy, the second group with background retinopathy, and the third group with proliferative retinopathy.