baby boomer

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A member of the post-World War II ‘baby boom’ generation, which corresponds to those individuals born after the end of WWII—1945 until 1964
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

baby boomer

Any person born in the years immediately following the end of World War II (usually defined as the years 1946–1964) when birth rates in the U.S. were unusually high.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
She may not be in the first flush of youth but Carol, 52, is a member of an elite band, the traditional baby-boomers u those aged between 50 and 59 u who wield surprising power in todayAEs society.
Considering the current obsession with youth, it might seem appropriate to write them off as old-timers but these true baby-boomers u who make up around 40% of the population u are showing the mettle that means they will not bow out easily.
oIn the UK, baby-boomers have lived in an almost ideal time.
But the baby-boomers may have a hard task ahead of them, as Dr Prince believes that there is a current obsession with youth.
ThatAEs important, that they choose their lifestyles and thatAEs what baby-boomers are doing u asserting peopleAEs right to make their own choices.
The term, baby-boomers, means the generation born after the war but in the UK it is, strictly speaking, the population spike of people that will be 60 next year.
Especially strong in this regard is Waxman's analysis of American Jewish religion and ethnicity, and of the place of religion in the world of the baby-boomers. In his two chapters on "The Jewishness of Jewish Baby Boomers" Waxman parses carefully the data, which tell us how the baby-boomers define themselves religiously (they do define themselves as a distinct religious group) even as there are questions about their religious practices (they don't, in large measure, "practice").
Then there's Edwin and Sheryl Rosado, another pair of baby-boomers, who also found their place in the sun last year: a $58,000 vacation home in Tampa.
However, most housing analysts and vacation-home developers say baby-boomers like the Caffeys and Rosados will soon give vacation-home sales a shot in the arm.
Born between 1946 and 1964, the nation's 76 million baby-boomers are rapidly entering the prime vacation-home-buying years (ages 45 to 55).
As evidence, analysts point to a 1993 Cornell University study of what baby-boomers plan to do with their $10.4 trillion inheritance.
Experts also disagree as to whether enough baby-boomers have the financial resources to trigger a surge in vacation-home demand.