baby boomer


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Related to baby boomer: Generation Y
A member of the post-World War II ‘baby boom’ generation, which corresponds to those individuals born after the end of WWII—1945 until 1964

baby boomer

Any person born in the years immediately following the end of World War II (usually defined as the years 1946–1964) when birth rates in the U.S. were unusually high.
References in periodicals archive ?
In comparison, 17 percent of Generation X small-business owners and only 5 percent of baby boomers agree.
Many companies mistakenly assume that Baby Boomers have already fixated on the brands from which they will buy and that their earning and spending potential is on the decline, and so they've lost interest in marketing to them.
As a whole, baby boomers are just as engaged in their jobs as Gen Xers, defined as those born just after the baby-boom generation, but are more likely to be engaged than millennials, defined as those born after 1979.
Millennials are generally more upbeat about all aspects of engagement than are Baby Boomers or members of Generation X, but Millennials are specifically more positive about growth and development opportunities.
For many employers, as they struggle to keep up with health care costs, they have very little money left over for wage increases and richer benefits in other areas, so it has a huge impact directly and indirectly on the finances of baby boomers.
Baby boomers may lower annual market returns by a fraction of a percent over a 20-year period.
As baby boomers (those born between 1946 and 1964) begin to retire, however, financial advisors and the institutions serving this market must address the new and different financial needs this generation will have.
The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) is providing $1 million to increase housing options for seniors in Atlantic Canada and for the baby boomers who will soon be joining their ranks.
After watching the fallout of the recession of the late 1980s and early 1990s, Generation X is not looking for the lifetime employment that their Baby Boomer parents were told to look for.
Because they are the children of baby boomers who were tolerant of diversity, GenXers expect diversity in both race and gender in the work force.
A visitor to the Web site, The Baby Boomer Generation, left an article about aging-in-place communities and inspired this response from the Web Master: