beta-lactamase inhibitors

(redirected from b-lactamase inhibitors)

β-lac·tam·ase in·hib·i·tors

drugs (for example, clavulanic acid) that are used to inhibit bacterial β-lactamases; often used with a penicillin or cephalosporin to overcome drug resistance.

be·ta-lac·tam·ase in·hib·i·tors

(bātă lakti-mās in-hibi-tŏrz)
Drugs used to inhibit bacterial β-lactamases; often used with a penicillin or cephalosporin to overcome drug resistance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two different b-lactamase inhibitors (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid [EDTA] and boronic acid) were used for the evaluation of class A and B production.
Moreover, the b-lactamase inhibitors such as clavulanic acid or tazobactam can reduce the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of drugs.
AmpC b-lactamases are not inhibited by b-lactamase inhibitors like clavulanic acid and are clinically significant because they resist to a wide variety of b-lactamase inhibitors including a-methoxy-b-lactam such as cefoxitin.
Other phenotypic methods like the "Kirby-Bauer disk potentiation method with some b-lactamase inhibitors, or the cefoxitin-Hodge test, AmpC disc test, combined disc diffusion test and AmpC E test methods" are labour- intensive, technically complex, expensive and unsuitable for routine screening in clinical microbiology laboratories and may not detect all AmpC beta-lactamases.