beta-lactamase

(redirected from b-lactamase)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to b-lactamase: ESBL

β-lac·ta·mase

(lak'tă-mās),
An enzyme produced by many species of bacteria that disrupts the four-membered β-lactam ring of penicillin and cephalosporin groups of antibiotics, destroying their antimicrobial activity. The ability of an organism to produce a β-lactamase may be chromosomal and constitutive or a plasmid-associated acquired property.

β-lactamase

/β-lac·ta·mase/ (lak´tah-mās) any of a group of enzymes, produced by almost all gram-negative bacteria, that hydrolyze the β-lactam ring of penicillins and cephalosporins, destroying their antibiotic activity. Individual enzymes may be called penicillinases or cephalosporinases based on their specificities.

beta-lactamase

(bā′tə-lăk′tə-mās′, -māz′, bē′-)
n.
Any of various enzymes that hydrolyze and inactivate beta-lactam antibiotics such as penicillin, found in many antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

beta-lactamase

[-lak′təmāz]
Etymology: lactam, a cyclic amide, ase, enzyme
a bacterial enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the beta-lactam ring of some penicillins and cephalosporins, producing penicilloic acid and rendering the antibiotic ineffective. Also called cephalosporinase, penicillinase.

be·ta-lac·ta·mase

(bā'tă lak'tā-mās)
An enzyme produced by many species of bacteria that disrupts the four-membered β-lactam ring of penicillin and cephalosporin groups of antibiotics, destroying their antimicrobial activity.
Synonym(s): penicillinase.

β-lactamase

either of two enzymes: β-lactamase I is penicillinase; β-lactamase II is cephalosporinase.
References in periodicals archive ?
Naas T, Cuzon G, Villegas MV, Lartigue MF, Quinn JP, Nordmann P Genetic structures at the origin of acquisition of the b-lactamase [bla.
Also, the Company announced the introduction of the MicroScan([R]) microbiology test panels that automate the process of confirming the presence of Extended Spectrum B-Lactamase (ESBL) in certain bacteria.
PCR was used to amplify the AmpC b-lactamase genes CMY, FOX, DHA, ACC, MOX, and EBC by using previously described primers (13).
Studies show CIPRO(R) to be very effective against B-lactamase producing strains of Moraxella catarrhalis.
announced today that it has received a patent from the United States Patent and Trademark office entitled "Novel Sulfonamidomethylphosphonate Inhibitors of B-Lactamase.