azotemia


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azotemia

 [az″o-te´me-ah]
an excess of nitrogenous waste products in the blood. (This is the most precise name for the condition, although in the literature it is commonly referred to as uremia.) See also uremia. adj., adj azote´mic.

az·o·te·mi·a

(az'ō-tē'mē-ă),
An abnormal increase in concentration of urea and other nitrogenous substances in the blood plasma.
See also: uremia.
[azo- (azote) + G. haima, blood]

azotemia

(ăz′ə-tē′mē-ə, ā′zə-)
n.
See uremia.

az′o·te′mic (-mĭk) adj.

azotemia

Nephrology A higher than normal blood urea–BUN or other nitrogen-containing compounds in the blood; ↑ BUN may be: (1) prerenal, due to ↓ renal blood flow–with ↓ glomerular filtration rate–GFR and/or excess urea production, seen in dehydration, shock, ↓ blood volume, and CHF; (2) renal, with ↓ GFR due to acute or chronic renal failure; (3) postrenal, due to urinary tract obstruction or perforation with extravasation of urine; ↓ BUN occurs in pregnancy–due to ↑ GFR, malnutrition, high fluid intake, severe liver disease–↓ protein production. See Uremia.

Azotemia

The presence of excess nitrogenous wastes in the blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even thoughstage 4 renal failure was determined just after the operation, the level of the azotemia was decreased to stage 3 due to proper treatment.
None had azotemia. Urine culture reports were available for all patients; four patients had growth of gram-negative organisms (two Escherichia coli and two Proteus mirabilis).
He had severe thrombocytopenia (4,000 platelets/[micro]L); mild anemia (hemoglobin level 88 g/L); increased levels of aminotransferases (aspartate aminotransferase 282 U/L, alanine aminotransferase 489 U/L), lactate dehydrogenase (1,041 U/L [reference range 105 U/L-333 U/L]), D-dimer (6,311 ng/ mL [reference range 10 ng/mL-250 ng/mL]), C-reactive protein (237.8 mg/dL [reference range 0 mg/dL-10 mg/ dL]), and creatinine (2.6 mg/dL [reference range 0.6 mg/ dL-1.2 mg/dL]); and azotemia (blood urea nitrogen level 150 mg/dL [reference range 7 mg/dL-20 mg/dL]).
Unilateral post-obstructive azotemia clinically manifests as a progressive disease syndrome producing diverse irreversible derangements in renal dynamics.
Majority of patients showed pre-renal azotemia which improved within 48 to 72 hours of hospitalization.
The diagnosis was supported by long duration of Diabetes, evidence of target organ damage, proteinuria preceeding azotemia.
Hepatorenal syndrome is renal failure induced by severe hepatic injury and char acterized by azotemia and decreased renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate.
This failure of body to maintain the balance results in uremia or azotemia (retention of urea and other nitrogenous wastes in the blood).
Two patients died due to uncontrollable severe hypotension with shock; one individual had severe sequestration of fluid in the third spaces and the other had severe uncontrollable gastrointestinal bleeding (INR>2.5) with prerenal azotemia. Two patients died due to ARDS with type 2 respiratory failure.
In neonates with azotemia or obstructive cases urgent urological support was taken from department of urology; Institute of Kidney Diseases Hayatabad Peshawar for definitive surgery.
In addition, patients with raised urea (> 50 mg%) and creatinine levels (< 3 mg/dl), which subsequently improved without any specific intervention, were defined as having prerenal azotemia. Hyponatremia and hypernatremia were defined as serum sodium < 130 meq/l and > 150 meq/l, respectively.
Exceeding the normal values of creatinine and urea in blood and plasma was regarded as hypercreatininemia and azotemia, respectively.