azeotrope

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Related to azeotropes: boiling point, Azeotropic distillation

azeotrope

 [a´ze-o-trōp″]
a mixture of two substances that has a constant boiling point and cannot be separated by fractional distillation. adj., adj azeotrop´ic.

a·ze·o·trope

(ā-zē'ō-trōp),
A mixture of two or more liquids that boils without a change in proportion of the substances either in the liquid or the vapor phase, for example, 95% ethanol (actually 94.9% by volume, the rest being water).
[G. a- priv. + zeō, to boil, + tropos, a turning]

azeotrope

A mixture of two or more liquids, which boils without change in proportion in either the liquid or vapour phase, meaning they cannot be separated by distillation.

a·ze·o·trope

(ā'zē-ō-trōp)
A mixture of two or more liquids that boils without change in proportion of the liquids, either in the liquid or the vapor phase.
A mixture of two or more liquids that boils without change in proportion of the liquids, either in the liquid or the vapor phase.
[G. a- priv. + zeō, to boil, + tropos, a turning]
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References in periodicals archive ?
In between, R-514A is an azeotrope formulated to be a near drop-in replacement to R-123.
R-513A is an azeotrope of R-134a and R-1234yf that is a drop-in replacement of R-134a.
Doherty, "Computing Azeotropes in Multicomponent Mixtures," Comput.
Floudas, "Locating all Azeotropes in Homogeneous Azeotropic Systems," Comput.
HFE/organic solvents -- blends with constant boiling points (azeotropes) can be selected to remove contaminations like flux residues or medium weight oils.
By selecting the appropriate cleaning process -- neat HFE, HFE azeotropes, or HFE/co-solvent process -- it is possible to produce solvency for a wide range of soils.
Figure 1 shows saturation pressure temperature relationships for R-507 (an azeotrope), R-404A (a low-glide zeotrope) and R-407A (a high-glide zeotrope).
For a pure refrigerant or azeotrope, these lines would have no slope: no change in temperature at a given pressure during phase change.
Except for R-436A and R-436B, others are either azeotrope or near-azeotropes.