axonal


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

ax·o·nal

(ak'sō-năl),
Pertaining to an axon; most often used to describe the type of underlying nerve pathology responsible for generalized polyneuropathies. In this context, usually used incorrectly, that is, "axonal polyneuropathy", rather than "axon loss polyneuropathy" (to distinguish the disorder from a "demyelinating polyneuropathy").

ax·o·nal

(ak'sō-năl)
Pertaining to an axon.

ax·o·nal

(ak'sō-năl)
Pertaining to an axon; most often used to describe the type of underlying nerve pathology responsible for generalized polyneuropathies. In this context, usually used incorrectly, i.e., "axonal polyneuropathy", rather than "axon loss polyneuropathy" (to distinguish the disorder from a "demyelinating polyneuropathy").
References in periodicals archive ?
Disarm Therapeutics is a biotechnology company that is creating a new class of disease-modifying therapeutics for patients with axonal degeneration, a central driver of neurological disease-causing disability and disease progression.
Depending upon the results of EMG/NCS, the variants of GBS were labeled as demyelinating or axonal, using criteria adapted from Flachenecker et al6.
Proportion of AIDP and axonal forms to total GBS may vary between different countries.
WS is confirmed by histopathological and immunohistochemical examination, where myelin loss, characterized by vacuolation of the central and peripheral white matter is followed by degeneration and axonal loss.
In addition, silencing of Wnt5a expression was able to reduce the proliferation and regeneration of Schwann cells and then inhibit the axonal regeneration.
Giant axonal neuropathy is a rare, fatal neurodegenerative disorder that often manifests on imaging as a nonspecific leukodystrophy.
(2) Peripheral neuropathy occurs in vasculitis due to involvement of the vasa nervorum causing nerve ischemia and axonal breakdown.
On the other hand, if axonal damage occurs, regeneration activity starting in the following weeks with abnormal axonal branching and inappropriate target innervation presents in the paralytic side and in the non-paralytic side.
This phase is associated with a second set of symptoms including inflammation, neuronal and glial apoptosis, glutamate excitotoxicity, potential disruption of the BBB, axonal demyelination, and reactive astrogliosis, leading to the formation of a glial scar.
Multiple molecular, histological, and immunohistochemical assays in addition to behavioral and electrophysiological tests were adopted to assess inflammation, axonal loss, demyelination, and neuronal apoptosis in the retina, optic nerve, and spinal cord as well as the progression of NMO.