axillary temperature


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axillary temperature

Etymology: L, axilla, wing, temperatura
the body temperature as recorded by a thermometer placed in the armpit. The reading is generally 0.5° to 1° F less than the oral temperature.
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Axillary temperature measurement

axillary temperature

The temperature obtained by placing a thermometer in the apex of the axilla with the arm pressed closely to the side of the body for the time recommended by the manufacturer of the thermometer. The temperature obtained by this method is usually 0.5° to 1.0°F (0.28° to 0.56°C) lower than oral.
See: Temperature: Axillary
See also: temperature
References in periodicals archive ?
Results: There was no statistically significant difference between average age, weight, height, BMI, core and axillary temperatures preoperatively, at 30 min, 60 min and 90 min.
Oral versus axillary temperatures in human volunteers.
Conclusions: Axillary temperature measurement is not a reliable method of documenting the arrival temperature in clinically unstable neonates.
No statistically significant difference was observed in the mean period during which axillary temperature remained higher than 37[degrees]C--2.
Currently the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) (1995), the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) (AAP & ACOG, 1997) and the National Association of Neonatal Nurses (NANN) (1997) recommend axillary temperature measurement as the standard of care for neonates.
On the morning of March 9, she was transported to the same hospital because of an axillary temperature of 104.
In addition to providing noninvasive blood pressure, pulse oximetry and 4-second SureTemp(R) temperature readings, the enhanced QuikSigns monitor offers axillary temperature capability and an improved human interface.
When she was received in the emergency, she was obtunded, markedly dehydrated, febrile with an axillary temperature of 39.
2) A febrile convulsion is defined as a seizure in neurologically healthy infants and children between 6 months to 6 years of age with an axillary temperature of at least 37.
However the Brighton Collaboration Fever Working Group recommends a body temperature greater than 38C as fever irrespective of device anatomic site age or environmental conditions17 and a WHO expert study group accepts fever as an axillary temperature measurement of greater than 37.
Comparison of temporal artery, mid-forehead skin and axillary temperature recordings in preterm infants <1500 g of birthweight.