axillary temperature


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axillary temperature

The temperature obtained by placing a thermometer in the apex of the axilla with the arm pressed closely to the side of the body for the time recommended by the manufacturer of the thermometer. The temperature obtained by this method is usually 0.5° to 1.0°F (0.28° to 0.56°C) lower than oral.
See: Temperature: Axillary
See also: temperature
References in periodicals archive ?
While axillary temperatures may be considered, concern remains regarding their accuracy compared to core and oral measurements (Niven et al., 2015; Sund-Levander & Grodzinsky, 2013).
Results: There was no statistically significant difference between average age, weight, height, BMI, core and axillary temperatures preoperatively, at 30 min, 60 min and 90 min.
She had an axillary temperature of 100.5[degrees]F and a respiratory rate of 60 breaths/min.
Axillary temperature was taken by patients with a digital thermometer and recorded in patient diary card during the study, 8 times on day 1, 6 times on day 2, and twice on the other days during dosing period.
In a study of 66 trauma patients, AM axillary temperatures were correlated with TSH, T4, free T4 index, and T3 uptake.
Axillary temperature and rectal temperature were recorded upon arrival to the unit, using digital thermometers.
Hypothermia is described by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "axillary temperature less than 36.5degC".3 It has been defined differently by various researchers using dissimilar cutoffs and the body temperature being measured at various sites4-5, which could possibly account for the variability in reporting the incidence in different areas4.
Compared with patients with influenza infection only, those with pneumococcal co-infection more frequently had pneumonia (p<0.001), were more frequently admitted to hospital (p<0.001) and to the intensive care unit (p = 0.034), had lower O2 saturation (p = 0.006) and higher axillary temperature (p = 0.009), and more frequently had the following CURB-65 score criteria: confusion (p<0.001), respiratory rate >30 breaths/min (p = 0.009), and systolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg (p = 0.03) (Table).
Other inclusion requirements were documented fever (axillary temperature >37.5[degrees]C) in the past 48 h in absence of another obvious cause of fever, willing to participate in the study, willing to stay in hospital up to one week and to come for follow-up visits up to 28 days.
Amy maintained that she first became aware that Brandon's temperature was low at approximately 7 p.m., when Lyles took his axillary temperature, i.e., the temperature under his armpit.
His axillary temperature, pulse, respiratory rate, and blood pressure were 36.8 [degrees]C, 123/min, 28/min, and 106/56 mmHg, respectively.