axillary node dissection

axillary node dissection

The surgical removal of lymph nodes that drain a breast affected by breast cancer to debulk the tumor or to evaluate the nodes for evidence that the tumor has spread.
References in periodicals archive ?
Left segmental mastectomy of the lesion with axillary node dissection revealed a staging of pT1N0Mx.
(1) Angiosarcomas are becoming recognized as a complication following radiation therapy in women receiving conservative therapy for breast cancer treatment, as well as lymphedema following axillary node dissection. (1,2) As the incidence of breast cancer in the western world rises, so is the incidence of radiation induced angiosarcoma of the breast (RIASB), with a cumulative 15-year incidence of 0.9/1,000 breast cancer patients receiving radiation as a means of conservative therapy, with an average age of onset of 68 years.
Do all patients with sentinel node metastasis from breast carcinoma need complete axillary node dissection? Ann Surg 1999; 229: 536-541.
Moore also reports that some women having whole-breast radiation are able to cut their course of treatment from six weeks down to three weeks, and that, among women having a mastectomy (total breast removal), fewer women need full axillary node dissection (meaning fewer lymph nodes are removed).
Pellino et al., "The effects of low-thrombin fibrin sealant on wound serous drainage, seroma formation and length of postoperative stay in patients undergoing axillary node dissection for breast cancer: A randomized controlled trial," International Journal of Surgery, vol.
Axillary node dissection no longer standard of care.
The use of closed suction drain after lumpectomy and axillary node dissection for breast cancer.
Roberge is known nationally for her work in physical therapy for patients who have undergone axillary node dissection and/or treatment for breast cancer.
For women with no suspicious axillary nodes who undergo breast-conserving therapy, there is little evidence of benefit in doing a complete axillary node dissection compared with sentinel node biopsy alone, the reviewers report.
Another landmark study, the NSABP B-06 trial [5] in 1976 randomised women with Stages I and II breast tumours [less than or equal to] 4 cm in size to lumpectomy and axillary node dissection with or without radiation versus modified radical mastectomy.
British surgeon Charles Hewitt Moore advised mastectomy with complete axillary node dissection and chest wall muscles in the 1860s but it was William Halsted who made the concept of a radical mastectomy a practice in the 1880s.