axillary lymphadenopathy

axillary lymphadenopathy

A general term for clinically obviously enlargement of lymph nodes in the axillary region, which is a zone of lymphatic drainage from the arm and breast.

Aetiology axillary lymphoadenopathy
• Benign—cat scratch disease, ascending lymphadenitis, infectious mononucleosis, herpes zoster, HIV, sporotrichosis.
• Malignant—breast cancer, lung cancer, lymphoma.

axillary lymphadenopathy

Clinical medicine A general term for clinically obviously enlargement of lymph nodes in the axillary region, which is a zone of lymphatic drainage from the arm and breast
References in periodicals archive ?
Skin thickening (grade 1, 2: 13%, grade 3: 21.2% p: 0.3) and the presence of axillary lymphadenopathy (grade 1, 2: 50%, grade 3: 65.9% p: 0.1) were more frequently seen in high-grade tumors than low-grade tumors, but these findings did not reach statistical significance.
A 34-year-old female presented to our hospital with high fever (39.5 [degrees]C), a dark brown lesion on the dorsal side of her right hand, erythema on the medial side of her right arm extending from her right hand to axilla, right axillary lymphadenopathy, and pain in her right arm.
We report two cases of 21/2 month and 6-month healthy male infants with left axillary lymphadenopathy following BCG vaccination.
Computed tomography scan of the thoracic region showed axillary lymphadenopathy, probably reactive.
Upon physical examination, the patient had bilateral discrete small cervical and axillary lymphadenopathy, and the breast examination was normal.
In a previous study, a report of 3 out of 31 cases of BCC in the NAC have developed apparent axillary lymphadenopathy with histologically confirmed cases [15].
In this report, we present a case of a late-onset FMF (age 42 years) with a unique phenotype manifesting with retroperitoneal paraaortic, paratracheal, hilar, pelvic, and axillary lymphadenopathy in the setting of a complex heterozygous genotype implicating A744S as a new disease modifying locus.
(2,4-9,12-15,17-20) On occasion, the masses are accompanied by nipple retraction (2 of 19 cases; 11%) (16,20) and axillary lymphadenopathy (4 of 19 cases; 21%).
After a 6-week outpatient follow-up, the patient returned with newly developed right axillary lymphadenopathy. An aspiration specimen of the lymph node showed positive AFB staining and was submitted for molecular biologic analysis.
Examination revealed an active, anthropometrically normal, febrile child with axillary lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly.