award

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award

A term of art used at the National Institutes of Health (US) for the provision of funds, or direct assistance in lieu of funds, based on an approved application and budget to provide general financial assistance to a person or organisation to carry out an activity or program. An award is a statement that funds have been obligated; this includes both direct and indirect costs, unless otherwise indicated.

award

(ă-ward′)
1. An amount of money paid to the party prevailing in a lawsuit.
2. A formal public recognition of excellence.
References in periodicals archive ?
The award wage for trainees undertaking a diploma-level qualification was given as the federal minimum wage.
The combination of award wages and classifications now being within the jurisdiction of the AFPC and award rationalisation means that for many women workers, the concept of gender pay equity and the processes connected with this new wage fixing system have elements of deja vu.
The current test for DSP assesses an individual's capacity to work for 30 or more hours per week at award wages within two years, taking account of forms of mainstream training that may help the person to increase his or her work capacity.
Instead, minimum award wage structures seem to be more about maintaining and preserving wage relativities that are based on the notion that a fair wage structure is one where wages reflect the value of jobs, where value is determined not by the market but by the members of the FWA Minimum Wage Panel.
3 million workers on award wages will receive about $22 a week,' Jeff said.
The State and Territory Labor governments diverged in their position from the non-Labor Commonwealth, the former supporting a $20 per week increase for all award wages, the latter a $10 increase.
It was argued that enterprise bargaining would free small business from, among other things, the payment of minimum award wages and conditions, reduce the negative influences of trade unions and other negative outside influences such as the Industrial Relations Commission and that the bargaining process would create a more harmonious workplace culture (Business Council of Australia, 1989; Howard, 1992; Keirath, 1995).
In other words, in their tender to government they should ask for the appropriate sums of money to pay award wages.
Award wages for juniors are based on vague notions of need in relation to the cost of living and the work value of juniors in comparison with adults.
It comes as 78 leading Australian economists signed an open letter to the Fair Work Commission earlier this month, commenting that cutting award wages will likely hurt the national economy.
For example, Pusey and Turnbull describe how most respondents (66%) agree that award wages are the best way of paying workers and setting conditions.
However, other studies (for example, McGraw and Palmer, 1990; Sappey, 1985) found many employers were unaware of their obligations in regard to award wages and conditions.