awake neurosurgery

(redirected from awake craniotomy)

awake neurosurgery

Neurosurgery performed on a patient who is awake enough to describe sensations or contractions evoked by the surgeon who performs intraoperative electrocorticography and cortical mapping to better delineate tissue that can be removed. Awake neurosurgery helps minimise the loss of functional tissue.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Two months after her diagnosis, she was faced with the daunting task of undergoing an awake craniotomy, where the patient is conscious during surgery.
This Randomised double-blind comparative study of 50 adult elective patients with mass near the eloquent area with ASA grade I & II, Age group 18 to 60 years were selected for awake craniotomy. Patients were informed in detail about procedure.
This makes it amongst the first few reported cases in Rajasthan, wherein a unique neuro-surgical procedure - "Awake Craniotomy" or "Awake Brain Surgery" has been successfully performed.
Musa Manzini was given local aesthetic during what doctors called an "awake craniotomy" earlier this month at Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital in Durban, South Africa.
Manzini was given local anesthetic during what doctors call an "awake craniotomy" this month at Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital in Durban.
Michael Jenkinson, Consultant Neurosurgeon at the Walton Centre, said: "Awake craniotomy allows the surgeon to monitor important brain functions such as speech and movement, whilst removing the brain tumour.
Michael Jenkinson, consultant neurosurgeon at theWalton Centre,said: "Awake craniotomy allows the surgeon to monitor important brain functions such as speech and movement, while the removing the brain tumour.
In his talk, Prof Dr Khalid Mahmood said Lahore General Hospital had undertaken great advancement in the field of neuro and after DBS introduction of Awake Craniotomy way of treatment, more success would be achieved in the coming days.
Despite all the surgical and medical advancement in the treatment of GBM, median survival has not exceeded 15 months, although survival may range between 3 months to 2 years.1 In some cases of secondary GBM, survival has also been reported for up to 10 years.2 Surgical approach aimed at gross total resection enhances the efficacy of adjuvant treatment and prolongs the survival in such patients.3 Nearly 80% of recurrence develop within 2cm of the resection margin.3 Various modalities have been tried in order to improve extent of tumour resection, including neuronavigation, intra-operative ultrasound, intra-operative MRI (iMRI), awake craniotomy and more recently, 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) fluorescence guidance.