aversive stimulus


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Related to aversive stimulus: aversive behavior, escape conditioning, Conditioned taste aversion

a·ver·sive stim·u·lus

a noxious stimulus such as an electric shock used in aversive training or conditioning.
See also: aversive training.

aversive stimulus

[əvur′siv]
an undesirable stimulus, such as electric shock, that causes psychic or physical pain. See also aversion therapy.
References in periodicals archive ?
028), thereby suggesting that the derived extinction procedure was significantly more effective in extinguishing avoidance responding to the direct aversive stimulus than was the direct extinction procedure.
The purpose of this experiment was to examine the relationship between the provocation-free interval, which provides a period of escape from an aversive stimulus (point subtractions), and the rates of aggressive responding.
A persistent question in the study of avoidance is how avoidance behavior is maintained, particularly when continued avoidance responding prevents further contact with the aversive stimulus.
These results appear consistent with Michael's (2000) analysis of how the function of demands may be altered from an aversive stimulus to an opportunity for the delivery of reinforcement.
Although experiential avoidance differs in its topographical expression, this avoidance is maintained by the short-term reinforcement resulting from avoiding an aversive stimulus primarily via negative reinforcement processes.
Positive reinforcement is used whenever a desirable outcome follows an appropriate response, and negative reinforcement is used whenever an aversive stimulus or state of affairs is removed following an appropriate response.
The inactive participants' patterns of positive affect balance in the higher intensity exercise condition (if examined alone) supports Solomon's theory in that exposure to an aversive stimulus results in self-reported aversive feelings states during exercise and a rebound to a more positive state during recovery.
Any behavior that results in escape or avoidance of an aversive stimulus may be strengthened through negative reinforcement.
Although taste aversions generalize to other foods, mammalian herbivores continue to taste aversive foods in small quantities and readily resume consumption when the aversive stimulus is reduced or removed (76).
Such considerations may have set the stage for redefining "negative reinforcement" as the strengthening of behavior through the withdrawal of an aversive stimulus (Keller & Schoenfield, 1950; Skinner, 1953).
This event likely functions as an aversive stimulus.
In such cases, the aversive stimulus is often referred to as a negatively reinforcing stimulus or negative reinforcer.