auxesis


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auxesis

 [awk-se´sis]
increase in size of an organism, especially that due to growth of its individual cells rather than increase in their number. adj., adj auxet´ic.

aux·e·sis

(awk-sē'sis),
Increase in size, especially as in hypertrophy.
[G. increase]

auxesis

/aux·e·sis/ (awk-se´sis) increase in size of an organism, especially that due to growth of its individual cells rather than an increase in their number.auxet´ic

auxesis

(ôg-zē′sĭs, ôk-sē′-)
n.
Growth resulting from increase in cell size without cell division.

aux·et′ic (ôg-zĕt′ĭk) adj.
aux·et′i·cal·ly adv.

auxesis

growth from increase in cell size without cell division. See also hypertrophy.

auxesis

A near-extinct, nonspecific term for an increase in:
(1) Size of a cell, tissue or organ—i.e., hypertrophy; 
(2) Numbers of cells—i.e., hyperplasia.

aux·e·sis

(awk-sē'sis)
Increase in size, especially as in hypertrophy.
[G. increase]

auxesis

increase in size of an organism, especially that due to growth of its individual cells rather than increase in their number.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Note that although the hyperbolic items examined up to this point invariably belong to the category of auxesis (e.
This can also be considered a productive strategy in the creation of both auxesis and meiosis as illustrated in the extracts below.
In our data, hyperbolic items denoting the idea of accumulation, such as: a load, loads of (3), a pile of, compost heap, lots (9), are also productive strategies in the creation of auxesis since they are invariably used to enlarge quantities.
The classification into auxesis and meiosis in our data suggests that by far the tendency is to upscale rather than downscale reality when exaggerating.
Although traditionally hyperbole has been equated with auxesis and even nowadays the bulk of definitions invariably focus on the overstated use of this non-literal language form, this is a twofold figure.
Although the list of hyperbolic items extracted from the BNC conversations needs to be viewed cautiously, as a sampling rather than a catalogue, since hyperbole is a creative act and, as McCarthy and Carter (2004: 150) note, "the possibilities for linguistic creativity are infinite", the recurrence of certain semantic fields and subfields suggests significant aspects of this figurative language form in the expression of auxesis and meiosis.
It appears that the range of linguistic choices and degree of inflation to express auxesis is considerably wider than those to express meiosis.