autotroph


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Related to autotroph: heterotroph

autotroph

 [aw´to-trōf]
an autotrophic organism.

au·to·troph

(aw'tō-trōf),
A microorganism that uses only inorganic materials as its source of nutrients; carbon dioxide is the autotroph's sole carbon source.
[auto- + G. trophē, nourishment]

autotroph

/au·to·troph/ (aw´to-trōf) an autotrophic organism.

autotroph

(ô′tə-trŏf′, -trōf′)
n.
An organism capable of synthesizing its own food from inorganic substances, using light or chemical energy. Green plants, algae, and certain bacteria are autotrophs.

au′to·troph′ic adj.
au′to·troph′i·cal·ly adv.
au·tot′ro·phy (ô-tŏt′rə-fē) n.

au·to·troph

(aw'tō-trōf)
A microorganism that uses only inorganic materials as its source of nutrients; carbon dioxide serves as the sole carbon source.
[auto- + G. trophē, nourishment]

autotroph

an organism that can manufacture its own organic requirements from inorganic materials independent of other sources of organic substrates. Autotrophs are either phototrophic (see PHOTOAUTOTROPH or CHEMOAUTOTROPHIC, energy being derived either by photosynthesis where chlorophyll is present, or from inorganic oxidation where it is absent (e.g. hydrogen sulphide is oxidized by sulphur bacteria). Autotrophs are primary producers (see PRIMARY PRODUCTION). Compare HETEROTROPH.

autotroph

an autotrophic organism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Harte and Kinzig (1993) identify autotrophs and decomposers as core biotic components and inorganic nutrients and dead organic material as core abiotic components universal to most ecosystems [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1 OMITTED].
the compensating effect from predation is insufficient to allow establishment of the mixotroph along with the superior bacterial competitor (the autotroph is also excluded in this case).
Brown et al, 2004), and therefore, larger consumer species have substantially larger energetic requirements (the scaling of metabolic rate to body size is different for autotrophs, as well as microbes and protists; see Pretzsch and Dieler 2012 and DeLong et al.
Autotrophs, as you probably know, were among the first species of life on this planet and created their own food through photosynthesis, using sunlight to turn carbon dioxide and water into useful organic compounds such as sugars.
After I grow a batch of a particular autotroph, I filter out the ceils and am left with the organic carbon they produced and released.
Estimating the role of autotrophs in nonpoint source phosphorus retention in a Laurentian Great Lakes coastal Wetland.
Understanding how and when autotrophs evolved may topple the popular idea that life originated in a primordial pool rich in amino acids and organic molecules.
By doing this with glucose and dissolved carbon dioxide, both labeled with heavy carbon, I can distinguish whether each of the lipids I found was made by a heterotroph or an autotroph.
Although it is possible that zebra mussels may have positive effects on crayfish populations through associated effects on water clarity, autotroph and invertebrate production, we are concerned that energetic costs or physical constraints caused by attached zebra mussels may be detrimental to crayfish in the Great Lakes.
This metabolic chart of 286 reactions yielding 287 unique compounds constitutes the minimal metabolome of a reductive autotroph.
The dynamics of the estuarine environment and the ability to import and export substances create a mixture system that keeps a great association of physical, chemical and biological components, generating high biological productivity rates and elevated levels of autotroph and heterotroph biomass (Nixon, 1981).
The selective pressures placed on sessile autotrophs are truly unique and require that they be considered in a separate context from their zoological counterparts.