autotroph


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Related to autotroph: heterotroph

autotroph

 [aw´to-trōf]
an autotrophic organism.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

au·to·troph

(aw'tō-trōf),
A microorganism that uses only inorganic materials as its source of nutrients; carbon dioxide is the autotroph's sole carbon source.
[auto- + G. trophē, nourishment]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

autotroph

(ô′tə-trŏf′, -trōf′)
n.
An organism capable of synthesizing its own food from inorganic substances, using light or chemical energy. Green plants, algae, and certain bacteria are autotrophs.

au′to·troph′ic adj.
au′to·troph′i·cal·ly adv.
au·tot′ro·phy (ô-tŏt′rə-fē) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

au·to·troph

(aw'tō-trōf)
A microorganism that uses only inorganic materials as its source of nutrients; carbon dioxide serves as the sole carbon source.
[auto- + G. trophē, nourishment]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

autotroph

an organism that can manufacture its own organic requirements from inorganic materials independent of other sources of organic substrates. Autotrophs are either phototrophic (see PHOTOAUTOTROPH or CHEMOAUTOTROPHIC, energy being derived either by photosynthesis where chlorophyll is present, or from inorganic oxidation where it is absent (e.g. hydrogen sulphide is oxidized by sulphur bacteria). Autotrophs are primary producers (see PRIMARY PRODUCTION). Compare HETEROTROPH.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Presumably, a wider the range of body sizes moving from autotrophs to top predators in a system permits longer food chains.
Autotrophs, having no mouths, cannot drool, so the line 'autotrophs began to drool' may be accused of being misleading, as I am sure Dr Cooper would be among the first to point out.
If you had to choose, a good place to start the story would be with the autotrophs. Autotrophs are organisms that can create their own food, and many of them do it using photosynthesis.
Understanding how and when autotrophs evolved may topple the popular idea that life originated in a primordial pool rich in amino acids and organic molecules.
Two major groups of microbes in the ocean play essential roles in transforming carbon compounds and moving them from the surface ocean to the deep ocean: autotrophs such as phytoplankton, which produce organic carbon compounds, and heterotrophs such as bacteria, which recycle already-made organic carbon.
This generalization appears to be universal for all autotrophs, including those that use the reductive TCA cycle (Fuchs, 1989), those that employ the oxidative TCA cycle (Nelson and Cox, 2000), and those with the "horseshoe," or incomplete, TCA cycle (Ljungdahl, 1986; Ragsdale, 1991).
This suggests that the primary determinant of the N:P of CNR is food N:P and that grazer body N:P is secondary, a reasonable conclusion given the likelihood that cellular elemental composition is considerably more variable (both intra- and interspecifically) for autotrophs than for metazoans (Sterner and Hessen 1994).
In the course of studying biogenesis, we became aware of bacteria that were reductive autotrophs and fixed carbon from carbon dioxide through the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle (Fuchs, 1989).
In the first experiment, we constructed aquatic, microbial microcosms containing small numbers of autotrophs (unicellular green algae) and decomposers (heterotrophic bacteria) and maintained them under uniform environmental conditions for many ([greater than]25) generations, but randomly varied the number of consumer species (heterotrophic protists) stocked in these replicate microcosms.
The case is somewhat puzzling because what it means is that mixotrophy is so important in regulating the food web that the mixotroph must survive as an autotroph. In this case there would be no nutrient supply to mixotrophs via phagotrophy.
nov., a novel marine facultative autotroph and the putative symbiont of Thasira flexuosa.
The data could also be used for future analyses of organic carbon energy flow, as well as for those examining the interannual variability of heterotrophic processes such as the energy flow from autotrophs to heterotrophs.