autotransfusion


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autotransfusion

 [aw″to-trans-fu´zhun]
1. reinfusion of a patient's own blood; see autologous transfusion.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as collecting and reinfusing blood which has been lost intraoperatively or postoperatively from clean wounds.

au·to·trans·fu·sion

(aw'tō-tranz-fyū'zhŭn),
1. Withdrawal and reinfusion or transfusion of the patient's own blood; commonly the patient's own blood is collected on several occasions over time to be reinfused during an operative procedure in which substantial blood loss is anticipated. Compare: autoinfusion.
2. In the acute setting, withdrawal of blood from a body cavity followed by intravenous reinfusion of the blood to maintain homeostasis.

au·to·trans·fu·sion

(aw'tō-trans-fyū'zhŭn)
Withdrawal and reinjection-transfusion of the patient's own blood.
Compare: autoinfusion

autotransfusion

A transfusion with one's own blood. The blood may be collected early, in anticipation of need, or may be salvaged from internal bleeding and returned to the circulation, during a surgical operation. See also AUTOLOGOUS BLOOD DONATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Autotransfusion Systems Market is projected to reach $505 million by 2024 from $395 million in 2019, at a CAGR of 5%.
CATSmart is Fresenius Kabi's continuous autotransfusion system and features continuous-flow technology for ease-of-use in operating rooms.
Following the surgery, the blood salvage system collects the blood for the first 6 h after the surgery and then autotransfusion is initiated.
3) Compared with preoperative autologous transfusion, ANH autotransfusion is a simple operation, has low cost, short blood storage time and low visible component damage, and prevents repeated blood withdrawal.
Autotransfusion is an autologous technology involving the retransfusion of a person's own blood, which increases the need for traditional centrifuge devices for separating the RBCs from the blood.
The systemic blood volume increases by approximately 50% antenatally and by a further 50% at delivery, when a massive autotransfusion of blood from the involuting uterus into the general circulation occurs.
The acute pulmonary oedema developed by our patient, with the benefit of invasive monitoring and meticulous fluid management, is believed to have been induced by the transient increase in intravascular volume caused by 'uterine autotransfusion' following uterine contraction after delivery of the baby.
Intraoperative autotransfusion is associated with modest reduction of allogenic transfusion in prosthetic hip surgery.
Circulatory shock activates the sympathetic nervous system at the post-capillary mesenteric venules and results in autotransfusion to maintain cardiac performance [19].
in the maintenance of catheter patency for long-term hemodialysis.10 In addition it was associated with fewer catheter-related Infections bleeding risk and lower increase of the APTT when compared with heparin.10 In our hospital heparin was the most commonly used anticoagulant in the autotransfusion in patients undergoing orthopaedic spinal operations but the surgeons always complained that autotransfusion was associated with a more significant derangement of the postoperative drainage output than homologous blood.
Passive leg raising does not produce a significant or sustained autotransfusion effect.
Una serie de casos que incluyo 27 pacientes sometidas 3 a cesarea evaluo el efecto de la autotransfusion a traves de un proceso denominado rescate celular intraoperatorio, mediante el cual la sangre perdida durante una cirugia es recolectada, filtrada y limpiada a fin de producir globulos rojos autologos para transfundir al paciente (92).