autotomy


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au·tot·o·my

(aw-tot'ŏ-mē),
The act of casting off a body part as a means of escape; for example, the limb of a crab or the tail of a lizard.
[auto- + G. tomē, a cutting]

autotomy

(ô-tŏt′ə-mē)
n.
The spontaneous casting off of a limb or other body part, such as the tail of certain lizards or the claw of a lobster, especially when the organism is injured or under attack.

au′to·tom′ic (ô′tə-tŏm′ĭk), au′tot′o·mous adj.
au·tot′o·mize′ v.

autotomy

1. Fission of an organism, such as a bacterium or other cell.
2. Surgical removal of a part of one's own body.

autotomy

the deliberate casting of part of the body when attacked, as when a lizard casts it tail.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the edible crab, however, induced autotomy, which results in a clean severance of the limb without damage to the adjacent exoskeleton, does not cause physiological stress (Patterson et al.
Geckos: adaptive significance and energetics of tail autotomy.
Size-related aspects of arm damage, tissue mechanics, and autotomy in the starfish Asterias rubens.
Long-term and intensive studies at several sites in Victoria have recorded many skinks that had experienced autotomy, but very few were found with multiple regrowing tails.
In Nairobi, Seifert was able to document the first known case of skin autotomy in a mammal.
The process of total tail autotomy in the South American rodent Proechimys.
As such, it is important to identify the selective pressures for autotomy in this group.
Chapple DG and Swain R (2002) Distribution of energy reserves in a viviparous skink: Does tail autotomy involve the Loss of lipid stores?
Autotomy of limbs stimulates ecdysis (molt), and it is difficult to assess whether changes in molt are due to this physiologic response or to PAH effects.
Because red king crabs can autotomize (drop) injured legs, crabs with a fresh autotomy were classified separately from those with other leg injuries.
The influence of tail autotomy on agonistic behaviour in a territorial salamander.
Although these performance variables are not likely to affect fitness in Batrachoseps, which defends itself from predators with tail autotomy, differences in number of trunk vertebrae in Batrachoseps may have arisen via natural selection on some other correlated trait.