autotomy


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au·tot·o·my

(aw-tot'ŏ-mē),
The act of casting off a body part as a means of escape; for example, the limb of a crab or the tail of a lizard.
[auto- + G. tomē, a cutting]

autotomy

(ô-tŏt′ə-mē)
n.
The spontaneous casting off of a limb or other body part, such as the tail of certain lizards or the claw of a lobster, especially when the organism is injured or under attack.

au′to·tom′ic (ô′tə-tŏm′ĭk), au′tot′o·mous adj.
au·tot′o·mize′ v.

autotomy

1. Fission of an organism, such as a bacterium or other cell.
2. Surgical removal of a part of one's own body.

autotomy

the deliberate casting of part of the body when attacked, as when a lizard casts it tail.
References in periodicals archive ?
Economy of arm autotomy in the mesopelagic squid Octopoteuthis deletron.
Geckos: adaptive significance and energetics of tail autotomy. Science, 184: 1379-1380.
Several reptile studies have recorded caudal autotomy with occasional bifurcation occurring in regrowing tails.
This is in accordance with the fact that autotomy, the process which is close to fission, is neurally mediated [65, 66].
The cost of autotomy and regeneration in animals: a review and framework for future research.
Seltzer, "Dietary supplementation with the inhibitory amino acid taurine suppresses autotomy in HA rats," NeuroReport, vol.
"Autotomy in skinks, geckos and some salamanders is well known.
Comparison of autotomy behavior induced in rats by various clinically used neurectomy methods.
Thus, in her poem "Autotomy," Wislawa Szymborska appropriates the image of the holothurian (the sea cucumber) and that, when attacked, it splits into two as a defense mechanism.
Two new reports of autotomy of the tail in rodents.
An intra- and interspecific study of body size and autotomy as a defense in Orthoptera.
Autotomy, or appendage loss, is common in many animals, including reptiles, amphibians, mammals, birds, fish, echinoderms, crustaceans, spiders, and insects (see Maginnis 2006a; Fleming et al.