autosuggestion

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autosuggestion

 [aw″to-sug-jes´chun]
self-suggestion; the process by which a person induces in himself an uncritical acceptance of an idea, belief, or opinion.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

au·to·sug·ges·tion

(aw'tō-sŭg-jes'chŭn),
1. Constant dwelling on an idea or concept, thereby inducing some change in the mental or bodily functions.
See also: autohypnosis.
2. Reproduction in the brain of impressions previously received that then become the starting point of new acts or ideas.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

autosuggestion

(ô′tō-səg-jĕs′chən)
n. Psychology
The process by which a person induces self-acceptance of an opinion, belief, or plan of action.

au′to·sug·gest′ v.
au′to·sug·gest′i·bil′i·ty (-ə-bĭl′ĭ-tē) n.
au′to·sug·gest′i·ble adj.
au′to·sug·ges′tive (-tĭv) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

autosuggestion

The use of the principles of hypnosis on oneself; autosuggestion requires complete relaxation, slow deep breathing and repetition of phrases (as used in non-self-hypnosis).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

autosuggestion

Autohypnosis, self-hypnosis Pop psychology The use of hypnosis on oneself. See Hypnosis, Hypnotherapy.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

au·to·sug·ges·tion

(aw'tō-sŭg-jes'chŭn)
1. Constant dwelling on an idea or concept, thereby inducing some change in the mental or bodily functions.
2. Reproduction in the brain of impressions previously received which become then the starting point of new acts or ideas.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

autosuggestion

A form of self-conditioning involving repeated internal assertion of positive and helpful propositions.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005