autopolyploid


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au·to·pol·y·ploid

(aw'tō-pol'i-ployd),
An autoploid having two or more multiples of the haploid sets of chromosomes.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

autopolyploid

(ô′tō-pŏl′ə-ploid′)
adj.
Having more than two sets of chromosomes all derived from the same species.
n.
An organism having more than two sets of chromosomes, all of which were derived from the same species.

au′to·pol′y·ploi′dy n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Autopolyploidclick for a larger image
Fig. 57 Autopolyploid . Types of autopolyploid compared with normal diploid.

autopolyploid

a type of POLYPLOID in which there has been duplication of the number of each chromosome, all chromosomes coming from the same original species. For example, in Fig. 57, A represents one complete set of chromosomes. Like an ALLOPOLYPLOID, an autopolyploid is a mechanism for creating new species, particularly in plants. Allopolyploids are more successful, perhaps because autopolyploid chromosomes have pairing difficulties at MEIOSIS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Other models for autopolyploids have been published (e.g., Jackson & Casey, 1982; Jackson & Hauber, 1982), but, given their minor importance to genome analysis, they will not be treated here.
chrysoscelis) then the tetraploids had an autopolyploid origin.
However, this study, which suggests speciation associated with autopolyploid changes in chromosome number, is based on mitotic counts, which are notoriously difficult to interpret in Carex except in species with the lowest numbers.
Such males could well play a critical role in the origin of the apparently autopolyploid clones at Churchill.
inermis was an autopolyploid, more groups containing four chromosomes would be expected.
angustifolium has a selfing rate similar to diploids, and also runs counter to the observation that all known naturally occurring autopolyploid angiosperms are outcrossing (Stebbins 1957; MacKey 1970) and that there are no examples of successful, selfing autopolyploid crop plants (Bingham 1980).
The evolution of autopolyploids in many ferns, which is often associated with distinctive reproductive strategies, increases the likelihood of reproductive barriers and thus the potential for the development of spatial structure (Trewick et al.