robotics

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robotics

 [ro-bot´iks]
the science of designing exact mechanical, computerized instruments for procedures.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

robotics

(rō-bŏ′ tĭks) [Czech robot, robot]
1. The science and technology of using computerized or automated devices to perform functions that are either too difficult or too repetitive to perform manually. Robotics has numerous applications in health care. Surgeons use automated devices to improve control of their instruments, including scalpels and laparoscopes. Researchers use robots in experiments requiring repetitive tasks (e.g., sample analysis for the presence of minute concentrations of drugs or toxins).
2. The design, manufacture, and use of robots.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

robotics

The branch of technology concerned with the development of machines capable of performing complex tasks of a kind normally limited to humans. Robotic machines of limited function controlled by computer have now become commonplace in the manufacturing industries, but the expected development of anthropomorphic or humanoid robots, in the manner predicted by the writer Karel Capek in his 1921 novel Rossum's Universal Robots, has not been fulfilled in any but a trivial sense. Robotics is now impinging on surgery and is likely to be important in the future.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In a recent report for The Centre for a New American Security, a Washington based Defence Think Tank, autonomous weapons expert Paul Scharre drew an important distinction between existing, semi-autonomous and automatic weapons systems and hypothetical autonomous weapons systems of the future.
In international discourse, most references to targeting are actually to target recognition, focusing on the ability of the autonomous weapon to differentiate combatants from noncombatants.
The use of autonomous weapon systems under circumstances where all or almost all of the potential targets are lawful, or have already been vetted, may arguably also provide humanitarian benefits.
READERS MAY HAVE seen last month there was a lot of media coverage of a letter on autonomous weapons sent to the United Nations Conference on Conventional Weapons (CCW) from 116 founders of robotics and artificial intelligence companies in 26 countries.
Many nations, including the United States, will place limits on the use of lethal autonomous weapons systems (LAWS) to avoid the risk of collateral damage and to comply with international humanitarian law.
(27) To the list that is mentioned by Meagan Burke and Loren Persi-Vicentic, I add Autonomous Weapon Systems.
In order to meet the requirement of proportionality, autonomous weapons could be designed to be conservative in their targeting choices: When in doubt, don't attack.
Autonomous weapon systems are fundamentally different from prior forms of weaponry: their capacity for self-determined action makes them uniquely effective and uniquely unpredictable.
According to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), some experts believe that even if autonomous weapons systems can be used in compliance with applicable jus in bello provisions, the penumbra of the Martens Clause as echoed in the CCW Preamble would constrain the use of machines making life and death decisions "with little or no human control." (38) In its official statement to the May 2014 meeting of experts in Geneva, the ICRC extended this sentiment to conclude that "perhaps the most fundamental question is whether autonomous weapon systems are compatible with the principles of humanity and the dictates of public conscience.
"It is necessary to increase the exchange of expert knowledge on technologies such as 3D printing, synthetic biology, nanotechnology, robotics, the synthesis of the human face and autonomous weapons", he underscored.

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