automatism

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automatism

 [aw-tom´ah-tizm]
aimless and apparently undirected behavior that is not under conscious control and is performed without conscious knowledge; seen in psychomotor epilepsy, catatonic schizophrenia, dissociative fugue, and other conditions.
command automatism the performance of suggested acts without exercise of critical judgment; seen in catatonic schizophrenia and in the hypnotic state.

au·tom·a·tism

(aw-tom'ă-tizm),
1. The state of being independent of the will or of central innervation; applicable, for example, to the heart's action.
2. An epileptic attack consisting of stereotyped psychic, sensory, or motor phenomena carried out in a state of impaired consciousness and of which the affected person usually has no knowledge.
3. A condition in which a person is consciously or unconsciously, but involuntarily, compelled to performan certain motor or verbal acts, often purposeless and sometimes foolish or harmful.
Synonym(s): telergy
[G. automatos, self-moving, + -in]

automatism

/au·tom·a·tism/ (aw-tom´ah-tizm) performance of nonreflex acts without conscious volition.
command automatism  abnormal responsiveness to commands, as in hypnosis.

automatism

(ô-tŏm′ə-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. Physiology
a. The involuntary functioning of an organ or other body structure that is not under conscious control, such as the beating of the heart or the dilation of the pupil of the eye.
b. The reflexive action of a body part.
2. Psychology Mechanical, seemingly aimless behavior characteristic of various mental disorders.

au·tom′a·tist n.

automatism

[ôtom′ətiz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, automatismos, self-action
1 (in physiology) involuntary function of an organ system independent of apparent external stimuli, such as the beating of the heart, or dependent on external stimuli but not consciously controlled, such as the dilation of the pupil of the eye.
2 (in philosophy) the theory that the body acts as a machine and that the mind, whose processes depend solely on brain activity, is a noncontrolling adjunct of the body.
3 (in psychology) mechanical, repetitive, and undirected behavior that is not consciously controlled, as seen in psychomotor epilepsy, hysterical states, and such acts as sleepwalking. Kinds of automatism include ambulatory automatism, command automatism, and immediate posttraumatic automatism. Also called automatic behavior.

automatism

Neurology
A form of motor aphasia characterised by stereotyped utterances repeated multiple times, as if by compulsion; an involuntary compulsion to perform an act. Automatisms are associated with organic brain disease in the temporal neocortex. 

Associations
Psychomotor epilepsy, catatonic schizophrenia, psychogenic fugue, complex partial seizure, post-traumatic automatism, etc.

Psychiatry
Automatic and apparently undirected non-purposeful behaviour that is not consciously controlled.

automatism

Monophasia, recurring utterances, verbal stereotypy Neurology A form of motor aphasia, characterized by stereotyped utterances repeatedly repeated, as if by compulsion; an involuntary compulsion to perform a motor act Associations Psychomotor epilepsy, catatonic schizophrenia, psychogenic fugue, complex partial seizure, post-traumatic automatism, etc. See Aphasia, Motor aphasia Psychiatry Automatic and apparently undirected nonpurposeful behavior that is not consciously controlled. See Automatic behavior.

au·tom·a·tism

(aw-tom'ă-tizm)
1. The state of being independent of the will or of central innervation; applicable, for example, to the heart's action.
2. An epileptic attack consisting of stereotypic psychic, sensory, or motor phenomena carried out in a state of impaired consciousness and of which the person usually has no knowledge.
3. A condition in which a person is consciously or unconsciously, but involuntarily, compelled to the performance of certain motor or verbal acts, often purposeless and sometimes foolish or harmful.
Synonym(s): telergy.
[G. automatos, self-moving, + -in]

automatism

The quality of acting in a mechanical or involuntary manner. A feature of some forms of SCHIZOPHRENIA.

au·tom·a·tism

(aw-tom'ă-tizm)
1. State of being independent of the will or of central innervation; applicable, for example, to the heart's action.
2. A condition in which a person is consciously or unconsciously, but involuntarily, compelled to perform certain motor or verbal acts, often purposeless and sometimes foolish or harmful.
[G. automatos, self-moving, + -in]

automatism (ôtom´ətiz´əm),

n a tendency to take extra or superfluous doses of a drug when under its influence.

automatism

mechanical, often repetitive motor behavior performed without conscious control.

Patient discussion about automatism

Q. My friend told me that following a vegetarian diet will help to lose weight automatically? Is that so? My friend told me that following a vegetarian diet will help to lose weight automatically? Is that so?

A. No necessarily. Your body will be in shock for a bit from the switch over. I think eating natural and unprocessed foods cause the major decline in weight since its all natural.

More discussions about automatism
References in periodicals archive ?
When he ensouls an inanimate object as his adoring counterpart, he manifests precisely the unconscious automatism that has all along determined his comportment toward the world, his foundational investment in a narcissistic fantasy of perfection and ultimacy.
Hoffmann thus elaborates what may be regarded as a precursory figuration of the Surrealist concept of "psychic automatism," famously defined by Andre Breton in the first "Manifesto of Surrealism" (1924) as a deliberate suspension of rational thought and logic facilitating a desiring fantasia of tropological freeplay and nonsensical whimsy, of inexplicable happenings and spectacular appearance.
In their operation, Doctor Hoffman's desire machines are thus reminiscent of the serial, multiplicitous automatism on display in E.
But if the several representations of automata and automatism discussed thus far entail contrary implications of life and death, the invocation of six-legged invertebrates as metaphoric for the shapeshifting dynamism of the unconscious is no less overdetermined.
It is beyond the scope of this paper to review in detail the use of the term automatism throughout the legal and judicial system and the legal literature.
Supreme Court of Canada), the majority decision referred to "extreme intoxication akin to automatism or insanity.
One expert testified that the accused was probably in a state of automatism due to both organic and psychological causes, and thus was unable to form criminal intent.
Blair (Alberta Court of Queen's Bench), the expert witnesses stated that automatism was directly related to the height of the BAL, being virtually 100% certain at a BAL of 400 mg per 100 ml and 75% probable at a BAL of 200 mg per 100 ml.
The last part of Edge's comment is precisely what Myers referred to as sensory and motor automatisms.
Similarly, modern research and theorization on hallucinations (Bentall, 2000), hypnosis (Fromm & Nash, 1992), and creativity (Sternberg, 1999), for example, do not depend for the most part on the concepts of sensory automatisms, suggestions on the subliminal self, or subliminal uprushes.
We could follow up Myers's initiative in his analysis of sensory automatisms such as intuitions and all kinds of imagery-based psi-mediating vehicles.
The firm portion includes the following services: - the statement of the existing one; - studies of the radiological control system; - the deployment of the radiological control system in the installation; - connection to the radiological control system and power supply of the following equipment: COSSI, CAT, DT IONIX and GCC; - the realization of automatisms and supervision; - the dismantling of the old radiological control panel and certain equipment; - commissioning and initial safety checks and tests; - the record of the works executed.