transfer

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Related to autologous fat transfer: fat injection

transfer

 [trans´fer]
1. the taking or moving of something from one place to another.
2. the moving of a patient from one surface to another. Patients can be taught to transfer safely either independently or with minimal assistance if they can balance in a sitting position.
gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) a type of assisted reproductive technology consisting of retrieval of oocytes from the ovary, followed by placement of oocytes and sperm in the fallopian tubes by laparoscopy.
Gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT). Multiple ova and washed sperm are injected into the fallopian tube, where fertilization may occur. From McKinney et al., 2000.
passive transfer the conferring of immunity to a nonimmune host by injection of antibody or lymphocytes from an immune or sensitized donor.
sliding board transfer a method of transferring a patient: a smooth tapered board is placed under the patient and stabilized on the surface to which movement will take place so that the patient can glide across.
tendon transfer surgical relocation of the insertion of a tendon of a normal muscle to another site to take over the function of another muscle inactivated by trauma or disease.
tubal embryo transfer (TET)
1. a method of assisted reproductive technology consisting of retrieval of oocytes from the ovary, followed by their fertilization and culture in the laboratory with placement of the resulting embryos in the fallopian tubes by laparoscopy more than 24 hours after the original retrieval.
2. laparoscopic transfer of cryopreserved embryos to the fallopian tubes.
zygote intrafallopian transfer (ZIFT) a type of assisted reproductive technology consisting of retrieval of oocytes from the ovary, followed by their fertilization and culture in the laboratory and the placement of the resulting zygotes in the fallopian tubes by laparoscopy 24 hours after the original retrieval.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

trans·fer

(trans'fĕr),
1. Process of removal or transferral.
2. A condition in which learning in one situation influences learning in another situation; a carry-over of learning that may be positive in effect, as when learning one behavior facilitates the learning of something else, or may be negative, as when one habit interferes with the acquisition of a later one.
Synonym(s): transmission (1)
[L. trans-fero, to bear across]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

transfer

Medspeak
noun
(1) A popular term for a patient whose care has been passed from one service to another.
(2) The changing of a thing’s position in relationship to others.

verb To pass the care of a patient from one service or ward to another.
 
Medspeak-UK
When the care of an individual is passed from one professional to another and/or one agency to another and/or one location to another.
 
Psychiatry
noun A neurologic equivalent applied to a time, place, or situation other than the way in which the equivalent was initially learned.
 
Reproduction medicine
noun The moving of a fertilised egg or more advanced reproductive product from one environment to another which is more suitable for long-term survival.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

transfer

Medtalk noun
1. A popular term for a Pt whose care has been passed from one service to another.
2. The changing of a thing's position with relationship to others. See Blastocyst transfer, Egg transfer, Electron transfer, Electronic funds transfer, Embryo transfer, Gamete intrafallopian transfer, Gene transfer, Linear transfer, Microvascular free toe transfer, Somatic-cell nuclear transfer, Zygote intrafallopian transfer verbTo pass the care of a Pt from one service or ward to another.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

trans·fer

(trans'fĕr)
1. Process of removal or change of place.
2. A condition in which learning in one situation influences learning in another situation; a carryover of learning that may be positive in effect, as when learning one behavior facilitates the learning of something else, or may be negative, as when one habit interferes with the acquisition of a later one.
Synonym(s): transmission (1) .
3. In physical therapy, movement of a patient from one surface (e.g., bed, chair) to another.
[L. trans-fero, to bear across]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about transfer

Q. can hepatitis be transferred from fathers sperm when concieving a child? My partner has hepatitis C and he has gotten me pregnant will our baby have it too?

A. Here is taken from wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hepatitis_C#Transmission) :

Sexual transmission of HCV is considered to be rare. Studies show the risk of sexual transmission in heterosexual, monogamous relationships is extremely rare or even null. The CDC does not recommend the use of condoms between long-term monogamous discordant couples (where one partner is positive and the other is negative). However, because of the high prevalence of hepatitis C, this small risk may translate into a non-trivial number of cases transmitted by sexual routes. Vaginal penetrative sex is believed to have a lower risk of transmission than sexual practices that involve higher levels of trauma to anogenital mucosa.

Mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis C has been well described, but occurs relatively infrequently. Transmission occurs only among women who are HCV RNA positive at the time of delivery; the risk of transmission in this setting is approximately 6 out of 100. Among women w

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References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Figure 3: Aesthetic improvement after autologous fat transfer, baseline (a, b, c) and 3 months after autologous fat transfer (d, e, f).
The use of autologous fat transfer, which uses fatty tissue from other parts of the body and transplants it into the wound, could possibly improve the quality and appearance of scar tissue.
This is sometimes referred to as 'autologous fat transfer' and in general, for these procedures, fat is removed from one area of the patient's body (for example, the stomach), cleaned, and then re-injected into an area of the body where contouring is desired, for example, to reduce or eliminate wrinkles.

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