autoinoculation


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autoinoculation

 [aw″to-ĭ-nok″u-la´shun]
inoculation with microorganisms from one' s own body.

au·to·in·oc·u·la·tion

(aw'tō-in-ok'yū-lā'shŭn),
Seeding or establishing an infection by transferring an organism from one area of the body to another. Patients who are asymptomatic nasal carriers of Staphylococcus may autoinoculate areas of breached skin, on other parts of the body, causing clinical infection and cellulites.

autoinoculation

/au·to·in·oc·u·la·tion/ (-in-ok″u-la´shun) inoculation with microorganisms from one's own body.

autoinoculation

(ô′tō-ĭ-nŏk′yə-lā′shən)
n.
1. Inoculation with a vaccine made from microorganisms obtained from the recipient's own body.
2. An infection caused by a disease that has spread from a different part of the body.

au′to·in·oc′u·la·ble adj.

autoinoculation

[-inok′yəlā′shən]
Etymology: Gk, autos + L, inoculare, to graft
a secondary infection originating from a focus of infection already present in the body.

autoinoculation

(1) The infection of a host with a pathogen—e.g., a virus, bacterium—which is already residing on it.
(2) An uncommonly used term for a procedure in which cells are removed from the body, treated in some fashion, then returned to the body.

au·to·in·oc·u·la·tion

(aw'tō-in-ok-yū-lā'shŭn)
A secondary infection originating from a focus of infection already present in the body.

autoinoculation

1. Inoculation with a vaccine derived from substances from the same person's body.
2. A secondary or recurrent infection by organisms already in the body.

au·to·in·oc·u·la·tion

(aw'tō-in-ok-yū-lā'shŭn)
Seeding or establishing an infection by transferring an organism from one area of the body to another. Patients who are asymptomatic nasal carriers of Staphylococcus may autoinoculate areas of breached skin, on other parts of the body, causing clinical infection and cellulites.

autoinoculation

inoculation of one's own body.
References in periodicals archive ?
In conclusion, our results suggest that oral HPV infection is unlikely to be acquired through autoinoculation.
15) Furthermore, molluscum lesions can scar, so prevention of autoinoculation may help minimize scarring.
Multiple lesions may occur after multiple bites, accidental autoinoculation by scratching, or metastatic spread.
Infection with the MC virus can also occur through fomites, such as shared towels, and by autoinoculation, especially when an individual with pruritic MC lesions (molluscum dermatitis) scratches the skin.
Fingernail cleansing and facial dipping disarm the autoinoculation process--the process where we unwittingly put into our bodies (through the eyes, nose, or mouth) unwanted germs or viruses.
clothing, towels, and toys); autoinoculation is common.
Other complications include autoinoculation, in which traces of the vaccine can be transmitted by a health worker's hands to the eyes, for example; progressive vaccinia (also called vaccinia gangrenosa); and eczema vaccinatum, a widespread skin reaction in patients with atopic dermatitis.
Interestingly, seasonal distribution of PSD cases exhibits a characteristic pattern of pharyngeal GABHS infections in temperate climates and supports the idea of autoinoculation through digital contamination or ingestion of GABHS (3, 17).
Conclusion: Autoinoculation is simple and effective in management of different types of viral warts including genital wart.
Following successful administration of vaccine, ACAM2000 produces vaccination site lesions containing infectious vaccinia virus capable of transmission through autoinoculation and inadvertent inoculation of close contacts of vaccinees.
It has been hypothesized that autoinoculation may happen when the infected pulmonary mucus interacts with wounded, susceptible areas of the mucosa, eliciting the emergence of lesions.
Spillage of endospores from polyps after trauma or surgery is thought to be followed by autoinoculation through the adjacent epithelium.