autoinfection


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Related to autoinfection: hyperinfection, retroinfection

au·to·in·fec·tion

(aw'tō-in-fek'shŭn),
1. Reinfection by microbes or parasitic organisms that have already passed through an infective cycle.
2. Self-infection by direct contagion, as with pinworm (Enterobius vermicularis) eggs passed in the infectious state and transmitted by fingernails (anal-oral route).

autoinfection

(ô′tō-ĭn-fĕk′shən)
n.
Infection, such as recurrent boils, caused by bacteria, viruses, or parasites that persist on or in the body.

au·to·in·fec·tion

(aw'tō-in-fek'shŭn)
1. Reinfection by microbes or parasitic organisms on or within the body that have already passed through an infective cycle, such as a succession of boils, or a new infective cycle with production of a new generation of larvae and adults.
2. Self-infection by direct contagion as with parasite eggs passed in the infectious state transmitted by fingernails (anal-oral route).
Synonym(s): autoreinfection.

autoinfection

Infection with bacteria or viruses surviving on or in the body, or transferred from one part of the body to another.

Autoinfection

An infection caused by a disease agent that is already present in the body.
Mentioned in: Threadworm Infection

au·to·in·fec·tion

(aw'tō-in-fek'shŭn)
Reinfection by microbes or parasitic organisms that have already passed through an infective cycle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, due to the autoinfection mechanism of the parasite, chronic strongyloidiasis may result in hyperinfection and spread to other organs [6, 18, 25].
Rhabditiform larvae mature and penetrate the skin in perianal area, leading eventually to autoinfection. (6)
Aberrantly, humans can assume the role of intermediate host by accidental ingestion of eggs in contaminated water or uncooked vegetables; by autoinfection due to unsanitary personal habits; or by reverse peristalsis of the eggs from the intestine to stomach.
Infections are generally soil transmitted, with the exception of Strongyloides and Enterobius, where infection can result from direct transmission and is perpetuated by autoinfection. Strongyloides hyperinfection can result from autoinfection in immunocompromised individuals, where infective larvae can cause a severe disseminated illness with a high fatality rate.
Ultrastructural details of the xenoma of Loma myrophis (phylum Microsporidia) and extrusion of the polar tube during autoinfection. Dis.
Upon fertilization, the oocyst may either pass out with feces or excyst in the host's intestine, thus starting a new life cycle (autoinfection).
Autoinfection can occur and represents a permutation of the life cycle.
* Humans develop cysticercosis by ingestion of Taenia solium eggs in fecally contaminated food or by autoinfection (from eggs carried from the intestine into the stomach by reverse peristalsis).
Once rhabditiform larvae mature in the host, autoinfection occurs and the filariform larvae are now free to reinfect.
Transmission occurs in three ways: direct patient-to-patient contact, nosocomial spread, and autoinfection (Smith et al., 1993).
In the latter two strategies, definitive hosts were generally infected by eating infected second intermediate hosts, but some infections occurred by autoinfection (digestion of their own infected skin), as seen in Glypthelmins sp.
Strongyloidiasis hyperinfection syndrome (SHS) is a manifestation of accelerated autoinfection in an immunocompromised host (chronic steroid users and HTLV-1-infected individuals) involving multiple organs (disseminated disease) and extensive gastrointestinal (GI) involvement.