autoimmune cholangitis

autoimmune cholangitis

An autoimmune disorder displaying the clinical and histopathological features of primary biliary cirrhosis, characterised by
(1) Positive anti-nuclear antibodies and/or anti-smooth muscle antibodies,
(2) Immunofluorescence negative for anti-mitochondrial antibodies,
(3) Biochemical or histologic features of cholestatic and hepatocellular injury, and
(4) Exclusion of chronic, viral, metabolic or toxic liver disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of particular note are primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), and autoimmune cholangitis (AIC).
Zhang et al., "Deletion of interleukin-12-p40 suppresses autoimmune cholangitis in dominant negative transforming growth [beta] factor receptor type II mice," Hepatology, vol.
We compared patients with AIP1 to those with AIP2 with regard to clinical and serological differences and surveyed the following characteristics: origin, gender, age, body mass index (BMI), concurrent autoimmune cholangitis (AIC), overlap to ulcerative colitis (UC), development of malignancies, response to steroid treatment, rate of relapse, immunosuppressive regimen, and profiles of serological and genetic markers.
Abbreviations AIC: Autoimmune cholangitis AIP: Autoimmune pancreatitis AIP1: Autoimmune pancreatitis type 1 AIP2: Autoimmune pancreatitis type 2 AP: Alkaline phosphatase CCC: Cholangiocellular carcinoma EUS: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided sonography GELs: Granulocytic epithelial lesions [gamma]-GT: [gamma]-Glutamyltransferase HCC: Hepatocellular carcinoma HLA: Human leukocyte antigen IBD: Inflammatory bowel disease IDCP: Idiopathic duct centric pancreatitis IgG4: Immunoglobulin G4 LPSP: Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis MMF: Mycophenolate mofetil UC: Ulcerative colitis.
Antimitochondrial antibody negative Primary biliary cirrhosis, a distinct syndrome of autoimmune cholangitis. Gut 1994; 35: 260-5.
Deletion of interleukin-6 in mice with the dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor II improves colitis but exacerbates autoimmune cholangitis. Hepatology.
Anti-CA I and anti-CA II antibodies (aCAIab and aCAIIab) have recently been isolated from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (8, 9), polymyositis and systemic sclerosis (9), endometriosis (10, 11), Sjogren syndrome (8, 9, 12, 13), idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (13, 14), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) (12, 13, 15, 16), and autoimmune cholangitis (15).