autograft

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Related to autografts: allogeneic graft

graft

 [graft]
1. any tissue or organ for implantation or transplantation.
2. to implant or transplant such tissues. This term is preferred over transplant in the case of skin grafts. See also implant.
allogeneic graft allograft.
autodermic graft (autoepidermic graft) a skin graft taken from the patient's own body.
autologous graft (autoplastic graft) a graft taken from another area of the patient's own body; called also autograft.
avascular graft a graft of tissue in which not even transient vascularization is achieved.
bone graft bone transplanted from one site to another.
bypass graft an autograft consisting of a segment of vein or artery grafted into place in a bypass.
cable graft a nerve graft made up of several sections of nerve in the manner of a cable.
coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) see under bypass.
cutis graft dermal graft.
delayed graft a skin graft that is sutured back into its bed and subsequently used after several days.
dermal graft (dermic graft) a skin graft of dermis, used instead of fascia in various plastic procedures.
epidermic graft a skin graft in which a piece of epidermis is implanted on a raw surface.
fascia graft a graft of fibrous tissue, usually taken from the external investing fascia of the lower limb (fascia lata).
fascicular graft a nerve graft in which bundles of nerve fibers are approximated and sutured separately.
filler graft one used for the filling of defects, as the filling of depressions with fatty tissue or of a bony cyst cavity with bone chips or dried cartilage.
free graft a graft of tissue completely freed from its bed, in contrast to a flap.
full-thickness graft a skin graft consisting of the full thickness of the skin, with little or none of the subcutaneous tissue.
heterodermic graft a skin graft taken from a donor of another species.
heterologous graft (heteroplastic graft) xenograft.
homologous graft a graft of tissue obtained from the body of another animal of the same species but with a genotype differing from that of the recipient; called also allograft and homograft.
inlay graft a skin graft or mucosal graft applied by spreading the graft over a stent and suturing the graft and mold into a prepared pocket.
isogeneic graft (isologous graft) (isoplastic graft) syngraft.
lamellar graft replacement of the superficial layers of an opaque cornea by a thin layer of clear cornea from a donor eye.
mesh graft a type of split-thickness graft in which many tiny splits have been made in the skin to allow it to be stretched to cover a larger area.
Mesh skin graft applied to the leg. From McQuillan et al., 2002.
Ollier-Thiersch graft a very thin skin graft in which long, broad strips of skin, consisting of the epidermis, rete, and part of the corium, are used.
omental graft a segment of omentum and its supplying vasculature, transplanted as a free flap to another area and revascularized by anastomosis of arteries and veins.
pedicle graft pedicle flap.
penetrating graft a full-thickness corneal transplant.
periosteal graft a piece of periosteum to cover a denuded bone.
Phemister graft a bone graft of cortical bone with cancellous bone chips to enhance callus formation.
pinch graft a small piece of skin graft, partial or full thickness, obtained by elevating the skin with a needle and slicing it off with a knife.
porcine graft a split-thickness graft of skin from a pig, applied to a denuded area on a human as a temporary dressing for treatment of a severe burn.
sieve graft a skin graft from which tiny circular islands of skin are removed so that a larger denuded area can be covered, the sievelike portion being placed over one area, and the individual islands over surrounding or other denuded areas.
skin graft a piece of skin transplanted to replace a lost portion of skin; see also skin grafting.
split-skin graft (split-thickness graft) a skin graft consisting of the epidermis and a portion of dermis.
Diagram of a cross-section of the skin, demonstrating split thickness and full thickness skin grafts. From Roberts and Hedges, 1991.
syngeneic graft syngraft.
thick-split graft a skin graft consisting of the epidermis and about two thirds of the dermis.
Thiersch graft Ollier-Thiersch graft.

au·to·graft

(aw'tō-graft),
Tissue or organ transferred into a new position in the body of the same person. Compare: allograft, xenograft.
[auto- + A.S. graef]

autograft

(ô′tō-grăft′)
n.
A tissue or organ grafted into a new position in or on the body of the same individual. Also called autotransplant.

autograft

A tissue obtained from one site on the body, which is donated (engrafted) onto another—e.g., the use of the quadriceps tendon for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

autograft

Surgery A tissue obtained from one site on the body, which is 'donated'–engrafted–to another

au·to·graft

(aw'tō-graft)
A tissue or an organ transferred by grafting into a new position in the body of the same individual.
Synonym(s): autogeneic graft, autologous graft, autoplastic graft, autotransplant.
[auto- + A.S. graef]

autograft

Tissue transplanted from one site in an individual to another in the same person. No immunological problems arise with autografts.

autograft

the grafting upon an organism of a part of itself.

Autograft

Tissue that is taken from one part of a person's body and transplanted to a different part of the same person.

au·to·graft

(aw'tō-graft)
Tissue or organ transferred into a new position in the body of the same patient.
[auto- + A.S. graef]
References in periodicals archive ?
The middle third of the patellar tendon of the patient, along with a bone plug from the shin and the kneecap were used in the patellar tendon autograft. Occasionally referred to by some surgeons as the "gold standard" for ACL reconstruction, it is often recommended for high-demand athletes and patients whose jobs do not require a significant amount of kneeling (5).
All cases operated between December 2016 and May 2017 using T-PRF autograft technique were included in the study.
Allografts have rarely been used alone and almost always in combination with autografts, BMAs, DBMs, or rhBMP2 for minimally invasive procedures (Table 3).
For instance, Pseudomonas aeruginosa destroys split-thickness skin grafts as well as epidermal autografts [30, 68].
Stankovic, "Reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon rupture with contralateral BTB autograft: a case report," Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, vol.
This meta-analysis, updated with 1045 eyes in 18 RCTs showed that bevacizumab would significantly reduce pterygium recurrence rate after surgery in either case of primary pterygium or use of conjunctival autograft or follow-up longer than 12 months.
This study was undertaken to analyse the efficacy of limbal conjunctival autograft and recurrence rate in farmers who are the outdoor workers exposed to hot, dry, dusty conditions and have a predilection for developing Pterygium and recurrence.
(3) The first successful human autograft transfer was documented by William Macewan in Sweden and later by Fred Albee, both in the late 1800s.
Recycled autograft like pasteurized one is partially destroyed by tumor and its biologic and mechanical property deteriorates further after heat treatment.
The first surgery involved right ACL reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone BTB autograft fixed using titanium interference screws, and medial meniscectomy of the right knee.
Fresh-frozen free-tendon allografts versus autografts in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: Delayed remodeling and inferior mechanical function during long-term healing in sheep.
Mortality was 6.25% (1/16) with the skin substitutes and 30% (305/1,008) with the autografts (P value less than .05), said Dr.