autoeroticism


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autoeroticism

 [aw″to-ĕ-rot´ĭ-sizm]
sexual self-gratification or arousal without the participation of another person, such as masturbation. See also alloeroticism. adj., adj autoerot´ic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

au·to·e·rot·i·cism

(aw'tō-ĕ-rot'i-sizm),
Sexual arousal or gratification using one's own body, as in masturbation.
Synonym(s): autoerotism
[auto- + G. erōtikos, relating to love]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

autoeroticism

noun Sexuoerotic self-stimulation—e.g., masturbation.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

autoeroticism

1. The deliberate arousal of sexual feeling in the absence of a sexual partner.
2. The satisfaction of sexual desire by MASTURBATION.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Autoeroticism; although a huge percentage (93%, 129 from 139) of male respondents named it as a risk factor, no such findings have been found that could second this thought.
Pre Post Autoeroticism 5.30 5.99 Heterosexuality 5.41 5.64 Homosexuality 2.90 3.33 Sexual Variations 3.78 4.02 Commercial Sex 3.91 4.35 Note: Table made from bar graph.
Rather than focusing on the details of that abuse, we should consider where Doctorow positions the "autoeroticism" scene in Daniel's narrative, as its significance is largely a function of its relationship to surrounding passages.
Rosario II, (eds.), Solitary Pleasures: The Historical, Literary, and Artistic Discourses of Autoeroticism (New York and London: Routledge, 1995), p.
She said Carradine, who Thai police believe had an obsession with autoeroticism that may have gone tragically wrong, owned almost every piece of bondage equipment the shop stocked.
bondage and discipline, sadomasochism, and/or autoeroticism, can choose to identify as queer' speak of differences in practice from vanilla heterosexual sex.
(270-71) Whether or not Farrar consciously intended the rhetorical similarity, her metaphor reflects a cultural intertwining of bodily excess and debility with female autoerotic and homoerotic intimacy, something Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick has argued constitutes an important juncture in the evolution of later lesbian identities: "[T]hinking about autoeroticism is beginning to seem a productive and necessary switch-point in thinking about the relations--historical as well as intrapsychic--between homo- and heteroeroticism" ("Jane Austen" 112).
Wilbourne's article concentrates on the play's central character, Florinda (played by Virginia Andreini), and her journey of sexual self-discovery from autoeroticism, to lesbianism, and ultimately to heterosexuality.
(5) Freud's most basic understanding of narcissism is that it is a state between autoeroticism and object love.
"These fantasies of nymphomania, vampirism, and male engulfment," Garraway points out, "were complemented by the trope of autoeroticism in the mulata [sic] Venus, whose cultivation of pleasure occurred not only at the expense of but in spite of her lover" (231).
Marion takes autoeroticism as the foundation of love: "auto-affection alone makes possible hetero-affection" (114).