autochthonous

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autochthonous

 [aw-tok´tho-nus]
1. originating in the same area in which it is found; said of pathological processes.
2. denoting a tissue graft to a new site on the same individual.

au·toch·thon·ous

(aw-tok'thon-ŭs),
1. Native to the place inhabited; aboriginal.
2. Originating in the place where found; said of a disease originating in the part of the body where found, or of a disease acquired in the place where the patient is located.
[auto- + G. chthon, land, ground, country]

au·toch·thon·ous

(aw-tok'thŏn-ŭs)
1. Native to the place inhabited; aboriginal.
2. Originating in the place where found; said of a disease originating in the part of the body where found, or of a disease acquired in the place where the patient is.
[auto- + G. chthon, land, ground, country]

autochthonous

Native to a particular place, thus a term sometimes used to describe an AUTOGRAFT.

autochthonous

(of peat) derived from plants that lived on the site of its formation. Compare ALLOCHTHONOUS.
References in periodicals archive ?
The perils of belonging: Autochthony, citizenship, and exclusion in Africa and Europe.
(I) the first school of thought maintains that the tribals' claim to their designation is based on 'aboriginality' 'autochthony' or 'indigenousness'.
After a summary of theories of nation and nationalism, she carefully investigates alternative nationalist projects of autochthony, indigeneity, and diasporism, and she ends the chapter with a brief analysis of feminism and nationalism.
Embodied with this theme would be the questions of foreignness and autochthony, sovereignty, and the practices underlying the political institutions and practices in the 'rajadom' of Sikka, and its environs.
He positioned the Oceanic Negroes at 'the last degree of the savage state' and thought they might 'originate in this part of the world', an insinuation of autochthony that gave credence to the once heterodox but now increasingly plausible idea that human diversity is primordial and organic (1810-29, IV:229, 244, 253).
(15.) Peter Geschiere, Perils of belonging: Autochthony, Citizenship and Exclusion in Africa and Europe; Nantang Jua, "The Mortuary Sphere, Privilege and the Politics of Belonging in Comtemporary Cameroon," Africa 75 3 (2005); Francis Nyamnjoh, and M.
Autochthony, ethnicity, indigeneity and nationalism : Time-honouring and state-oriented modes of rooting individual-territory-group triads in a globalizing world.
From this follows that Osundare succumbs to the "false consciousness" of his animist autochthony: in an apparent intertextual dialogue with Soyinka's "Idanre" Osundare--in his own formal verse-making approximates--intimates and excavates the underlying epistemic, metaphysical, and socio-historical imperatives embodied in and typified by the Yoruba pantheon.
autochthony but one of always already coming from somewhere else"
Arguably, in Nigeria, Muslims and Christians alike have maintained opposing viewpoints so far as leadership religious affiliation and autochthony are concerned.
In Heidegger's own term, it is exactly the atomic age that causes man's loss of autochthony. Science, Heidegger does not deny, successfully controls the life of man.