autochthonous

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Related to autochthonic: two-fold, scrutinised

autochthonous

 [aw-tok´tho-nus]
1. originating in the same area in which it is found; said of pathological processes.
2. denoting a tissue graft to a new site on the same individual.

au·toch·thon·ous

(aw-tok'thon-ŭs),
1. Native to the place inhabited; aboriginal.
2. Originating in the place where found; said of a disease originating in the part of the body where found, or of a disease acquired in the place where the patient is located.
[auto- + G. chthon, land, ground, country]

au·toch·thon·ous

(aw-tok'thŏn-ŭs)
1. Native to the place inhabited; aboriginal.
2. Originating in the place where found; said of a disease originating in the part of the body where found, or of a disease acquired in the place where the patient is.
[auto- + G. chthon, land, ground, country]

autochthonous

Native to a particular place, thus a term sometimes used to describe an AUTOGRAFT.

autochthonous

(of peat) derived from plants that lived on the site of its formation. Compare ALLOCHTHONOUS.
References in periodicals archive ?
The bear, like the snake, is autochthonic; the prints that prompt Ike's encyclopedic spit heal "with unbelievable speed, a passionate and almost visible relinquishment, back into the earth" (150-51).
The serpent, in rising to transgender an autochthonic vagina, merely replicates a prior transgendering achieved by Old Ben.
"The spirit and letter" of the rules that govern the military, like other institutions in American civil society, are "aristocratic," and are therefore "exotic": they are not autochthonic, not rooted in America's grass, but rather are borrowed from a country with "feudal" foundations.
Faulkner also comically disparaged the critical tendency to appraise American writers in the context of Russian authors in Sherwood Anderson and Other Famous Creoles, preferring rather to see them as independent and autochthonic. These early reactions were probably little more than a combination of a Bloomsian anxiety of influence and the Faulknerian love of the mystification, because Faulkner later acknowledged that he read Dostoevsky in his teens (Weisgerber xii), and testified throughout his life to the importance of Russian literature to him as a writer and reader.
My focus here will be on the implications of this double crisis for the growth of the global phenomenon of autochthonic political projects of belonging, both locally and globally; and also for the simultaneous growth of libertarian activist citizenship movements of resistance.
The rise of autochthonic political projects of belonging
The first form of resistance discussed here is that of autochthonic politics, which I consider to be the hegemonic form of contemporary racisms.
The poet suggests that Walt would have preferred something closer to the earth, something more autochthonic, more indigenous ("a Cheyenne dance"), but that even the highly civilized waltz is good enough for him as "he dances peacefully in Jack's arms." The key to the poem is in the quiet final twist of the simple concluding couplet: "His steps are natural / gliding the gleaming barroom floor." Protected and at peace within Jack's arms, he moves naturally across the floor, for this, in fact, is in accord with his nature.