autochthonous

(redirected from autochthon)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

autochthonous

 [aw-tok´tho-nus]
1. originating in the same area in which it is found; said of pathological processes.
2. denoting a tissue graft to a new site on the same individual.

au·toch·thon·ous

(aw-tok'thon-ŭs),
1. Native to the place inhabited; aboriginal.
2. Originating in the place where found; said of a disease originating in the part of the body where found, or of a disease acquired in the place where the patient is located.
[auto- + G. chthon, land, ground, country]

autochthonous

/au·toch·tho·nous/ (aw-tok´thah-nus)
1. originating in the same area in which it is found.
2. denoting a tissue graft to a new site on the same individual.

autochthonous

[ôtok′thənəs]
Etymology: Gk, autos, self, chthon, earth
relating to a disease or other condition that appears to have originated in the part of the body in which it was discovered.

au·toch·thon·ous

(aw-tok'thŏn-ŭs)
1. Native to the place inhabited; aboriginal.
2. Originating in the place where found; said of a disease originating in the part of the body where found, or of a disease acquired in the place where the patient is.
[auto- + G. chthon, land, ground, country]

autochthonous

Native to a particular place, thus a term sometimes used to describe an AUTOGRAFT.

autochthonous

(of peat) derived from plants that lived on the site of its formation. Compare ALLOCHTHONOUS.

autochthonous

1. originating in the same area in which it is found.
2. denoting a tissue graft to a new site on the same individual.
References in periodicals archive ?
A particularly interesting aspect is how she starts from the marginalized autochthons and shows that part of the process is internal.
11) Nativist discourses on autochthon history and inter-Southern solidarity also tended to display selective amnesia and some distortion of the facts.
At the level of narrative strategy, the most evident case of the erasure of the authors' self-representation is in the report of dialogues which follows a fixed pattern: they are transcribed as direct speech when it is the autochthons to speak, while they are in the form of transposed speech when it is the authors' turn.
In Romanian historiography, the topic of incineration necropolises was taken up in strict connection to the continuity of Dacian autochthons during the Roman era (61).
Traveling to remote resorts where the poverty of autochthons underscores tourists' self-indulgent affluence, his nomadic vacationers seek out landscapes of desolation that set off the oases of beauty and luxury where they couple in groups of three or four.
As a result of these three waves of immigration, the population has been divided into two groups: autochthons or populations previously settled (a group comprising those settled before the 15th century) and people coming from elsewhere (a group composed of populations settled from the 15th century onwards).
Fearful of the transcendent which sucks him up into endless blue space, he envies the blindness of the autochthons who share his summit-home, wishing to resemble "les taupes du ciel" (30).
People could, for example, enlist the support of autochthons on their own.
Mobility and exclusion: Conflicts between autochthons and allochthons during political liberalization in Cameroon
Attempts have been made to classify the Nepalese into "the communities that largely use languages or dialects of Sino-Tibetan family who belong to or are believed in general to have originated from the Mongolian racial stock; the dominant ruling castes of Brahmans and Kshtriyas of Indo-Aryan origin, who live largely is the hills and speak Nepali as their vernacular; as lastly, the people who live in the plains of the South and had either migrated from India in the last two centuries to the Tarai or were living there as autochthons (of Austric-Dravidian Origin) and speak dialects of the Southern region" (Aditya, 1991:2).
Fix up the atmosphere, improve cultural opportunities for my autochthons, you know.