auscultatory sound

aus·cul·ta·to·ry sound

a rale, murmur, bruit, fremitus, or other sound heard on auscultation of the chest or abdomen.

aus·cul·ta·to·ry sound

(aw-skŭltă-tōr-ē sownd)
Rale, murmur, bruit, fremitus, or other sound heard on auscultation of the chest or abdomen.
References in periodicals archive ?
These include tachycardia, bradycardia, hypotension, a water-wheel or mill-wheel murmur (a characteristic splashing auscultatory sound due to the presence of gas in the cardiac chamber), shock-like picture, cardiac arrest, crackles, wheezing, tachypnea, hypoxemic respiratory failure altered mental status, focal neurological deficits, syncope, coma, crepitus in superficial vessels if skin is involved, and bubbles within the retinal arteries.
The dogs under group II with airway obstruction had costoabdominal type of respiration, inspiratory dyspnoea, synchronous movement of thoracic and abdominal wall, increased auscultatory sounds characterized by stridor or stertor.
The second edition of Traite (1826) introduced a nomenclature of auscultatory sounds (rales, fremitus, egophony, pectoriloquy, bronchophony) heard in organ pathology that formerly was called "lung fever.