auscultation

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auscultation

 [aw″skul-ta´shun]
listening for sounds produced within the body, chiefly to assess the condition of the thoracic or abdominal organs and vessels such as the heart, lungs, aorta, and intestines. Fetal heart tones can also be monitored during pregnancy by auscultation with a specialized stethoscope. It may be performed with the unaided ear (direct or immediate auscultation) or with a stethoscope (mediate auscultation). See also auscultatory sounds.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

aus·cul·ta·tion

(aws'kŭl-tā'shŭn),
Listening to the sounds made by the various body structures as a diagnostic method.
[L. ausculto, pp. -atus, to listen to]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

auscultation

(ô′skəl-tā′shən)
n.
1. The act of listening.
2. Medicine The act of listening for sounds made by internal organs, as the heart and lungs, to aid in the diagnosis of certain disorders.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

auscultation

The act of auscultating.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

aus·cul·ta·tion

(aws'kŭl-tā'shŭn)
Listening to the sounds made by various body structures and functions as a diagnostic method, usually with a stethoscope.
[L. auscultatio, fr. ausculto, pp. auscultatus, to listen, + -io, noun suffix]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

auscultation

The act of listening with a stethoscope to the sounds made by the heart, lungs, blood passing through narrowed vessels, the movement of fluid or gas in the abdomen, and so on. The doctor listens for changes in the normal sounds and for new (adventitious) sounds. Heart specialists become skilled in the interpretation of subtle sounds inaudible to the novice. From the Latin auscultare , to listen attentively.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Auscultation

The process of listening to sounds that are produced in the body. Direct auscultation uses the ear alone, such as when listening to the grating of a moving joint. Indirect auscultation involves the use of a stethoscope to amplify the sounds from within the body, like a heartbeat.
Mentioned in: Physical Examination
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

bruit 

A sound heard on auscultation of the heart, lungs, large arteries or veins, or any large cavity (e.g. the orbit). The auscultation is carried out with a stethoscope. Example: An occlusive disease of the carotid artery caused by atherosclerosis leads to a reduction in blood flow through the carotid arteries (and a concomitant reduction in blood flow through vessels of the eye and orbit). It gives rise to a swishing sound with the chest piece of the stethoscope on the neck over the carotid artery. See amaurosis fugax.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

aus·cul·ta·tion

(aws'kŭl-tā'shŭn)
Listening to the sounds made by various body structures as a diagnostic method.
[L. auscultatio, fr. ausculto, pp. auscultatus, to listen, + -io, noun suffix]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Publication of auscultated sounds recorded over specific respiratory tract pathologies, defined during simultaneous ultrasonographic investigation, has allowed clinicians to assess the value of auscultation of the chest performed as part of the standard veterinary clinical examination of sheep [5, 7] and cattle [8].
No murmurs, rubs, gallops were auscultated. There were 2+ pitting edema of both lower extremities, extending from ankles up to knees.
(7), (17) As in adults, the use of Korotkoff sounds via the auscultatory method is recommended since research has shown that oscillometric values tend to be less accurate than auscultated values in children.
Historically, intermittent auscultation meant a very irregular check of the fetal heart beat and the auscultated fetal heart rate was described as a single number in beats per minute i.e 136bpm (Goodwin, 2000).
A previous laparotomy and laparoscopy scars were observed and normal bowel sounds were auscultated throughout.
I am having trouble breathing." Iva auscultated his chest and noted the crackles in his right-lower-lung field were increased compared to her morning assessment.
Difficult, that is, unless negotiation takes place through the voice and its alliance with thought and verbalisation, or unless the neglected potential of the body--this humming, whistling, cracking, snorting, sniffing, dripping, shedding, dropping and spurting, percussive, gnathosonic, auscultated, aerophonically explosive orchestral conglomerate, and not at all inert matter--is revisited.
It was seen that auscultated innocent murmurs when were evaluated according to their age distribution, the murmurs showed an increase, which was correlated to age until 9 years old and a decrease after 9 years old.
The animal should be auscultated for respiratory depth, cardiac rhythm, all valve areas, and any abnormal sounds.
No evidence of abdominal bruit auscultated. Scars noted below umbilicus and into groin areas bilaterally.
The anterior chest was auscultated and apparently equal breath sounds were heard bilaterally.