auricle


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Related to auricle: Right auricle

auricle

 [aw´rĭ-k'l]
1. the projecting part of the ear lying outside the head; called also pinna.
Auricle.
2. the ear-shaped appendage of either atrium of the heart; formerly used to designate the entire atrium.

au·ri·cle

(aw'ri-kl), [TA] Avoid the outmoded use of this word in the sense of atrium.
The projecting shell-like structure on the side of the head, constituting, with the external acoustic meatus, the external ear. Synonym(s): auricula (1) [TA], pinna1 ☆ , ala auris

auricle

(ôr′ĭ-kəl)
n.
1. Anatomy
a. The outer projecting portion of the ear. Also called pinna.
b. See atrium.
2. Biology An earlobe-shaped part, process, or appendage, especially at the base of an organ.

au′ri·cled (-kəld) adj.

auricle

(1) (Right or left) atrial auricula, auricula atrii dextri/sinistri—a conical scrotiform structure that projects from either the right or left atrium.
(2) Pinna of the ear, auricula auris externa—the fan-shaped fibrocartilaginous plate located around the ear canal on each side of the head, which is the more prominent portion of the external ear, the lesser and lower portion being the earlobe.

au·ri·cle

(awr'i-kĕl) [TA]
1. The projecting shell-like structure on the side of the head, constituting, with the external acoustic meatus, the external ear.
Synonym(s): auricula (1) , pinna (1) .
2. Synonym(s): auricle of atrium.

auricle

1. The pinna, or external ear.
2. An obsolescent term for one of the upper chambers of the heart (atrium).

auricle

  1. a former term for the ATRIUM of the heart.
  2. an alternative term for the PINNA (outer ear).
  3. (also called auricula) an ear-shaped part or appendage, such as that occurring at the base of some leaves.

Auricle

The external structure of the ear.
Mentioned in: Otitis Externa

au·ri·cle

(awr'i-kĕl) [TA] Avoid the outmoded use of this word in the sense of atrium.
The projecting shell-like structure on the side of the head, constituting, with the external acoustic meatus, the external ear.
References in periodicals archive ?
Characteristics of dermoid cyst of the auricle. Arch Craniofac Surg 2014;15:22-7.
Several different methods are used for the anthropometric measurement of auricle. In generally, these can be divide into contactable (Vernier calipers and ruler, etc.) and non-contactable methods (3D scanner, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and photography) (Liu et al., 2010).
While the auricle (83%) is classically affected most commonly in adults, the larynx and trachea (50%), nasal, costal cartilage, joints, eye (20-60%), skin (36%), and heart (<%10) are other anatomical structures that can be affected (4).
Matsumoto, "Vascular leiomyoma of the auricle," Archives of Dermatology, vol.
The amputated portion of the auricle was placed in a plastic bag with saline, surrounded by ice, and brought to the emergency room with the individual.
Monaural cues are directionally dependent on spectral changes, which are produced due to reflections of sound waves from the folds of the auricle. Monaural and binaural cues are known as the head-related transfer function (HRTF).
Most importantly, in the cited study, no placebo was used and the points on the auricle where electrical stimulation was applied were anatomically different, as were the duration and frequency of the applied electrical stimuli.
(2011) this subgenus is characterized by more or less convolute stem leaves, appressed to the stem when dry, spreading when moist; dorsal leaf lobe longer than broad; auricles at leaf base lacking or not similar in size, the dorsal auricle distinctly larger than the ventral one, and perianth surface smooth.
Inhibitory effect on the swelling of mouse auricle that was induced by dimethyl benzene
Plastic surgeons, speech therapists, and otolaryngologists from Japan provide information on etiology and gene mutation; diagnosis, including imaging, audiometry, development of the auricle and external auditory canal and rib cartilage, bone-conduction auditory brainstem response and steady-state response, anomalies of the auditory ossicles, otitis media and subcutaneous abscess, and deciding on the position, timing, and method of surgery; surgical procedures, with illustrations and photos; intraoperative and postoperative complications like infection, necrosis, and facial nerve palsy; outcomes; management of postoperative wounds; hair removal; long-term hearing results; and psychological changes in patients.
Jeon et al., "Sensation recovery of auricle following chronic ear surgery by retroauricular incision," European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, vol.
The auricle is developed from the fusion of 6 auricular hillocks from the first 2 pharyngeal arches.