augmentation cystoplasty

cystoplasty

 [sis´to-plas″te]
plastic surgery of the bladder, usually referring to some type of augmentation cystoplasty.
augmentation cystoplasty enlargement of the bladder by grafting to it a detached segment of intestine (enterocystoplasty) or stomach (gastrocystoplasty). Called also bladder augmentation.
sigmoid cystoplasty augmentation cystoplasty using an isolated segment of the sigmoid colon for the graft.

augmentation cystoplasty

Reconstructive surgery in which a segment of the bowel is removed and used to replace part of a diseased urinary bladder in patients with low bladder capacity or detrusor compliance, resulting in severe urgency, frequency, incontinence, recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs), pyelonephritis, or progressive renal insufficiency.

Complications
Bowel obstruction, blood clots, infection, pneumonia, urinary fistulae, UTI, difficulty urinating and, rarely, tumours.

Contraindications
Inflammatory bowel disease (especially Crohn’s disease), short or irradiated bowel, bladder tumours, severe radiation cystitis, severe renal insufficiency.

augmentation cystoplasty

Urology Reconstructive surgery in which a segment of the bowel is removed and used to replace part of the diseased bladder, in Pts with severe urge incontinence Complications Bowel obstruction, blood clots, infection, pneumonia, urinary fistulae, UTIs, difficulty urinating, and rarely tumors
References in periodicals archive ?
Another study also addressed safety in 80 children receiving chronic gentamicin bladder instillations where half had a prior augmentation cystoplasty.
In addition, augmentation cystoplasty can be a final solution if needed in very rare situations.
Augmentation cystoplasty was performed in 9 patients and bladder capacity improved significantly in all patients.
augmentation cystoplasty or bladder outlet surgery.
The utilization of the ureter in augmentation cystoplasty results in a uroepithelium-lined neobladder with all of the appropriate histologic layers.
The choice of a suitable scaffold for cell delivery and /or the ingrowths of bladder wall components are recognized as one of the key factors that determine regenerative capacities and graft function in augmentation cystoplasty.
The most common surgical option, augmentation cystoplasty, involves placing a "patch" derived from an individual's bowel over a part of the diseased organ in order to increase its size.
During augmentation cystoplasty the bladder is bisected and augmented with a patch of bowel.
Surgical intervention for conservative management failure is reviewed emphasizing careful patient selection for the respective interventions such as suprapubic cystostomy, sphincterotomy, sphincteric stents, augmentation cystoplasty, incontinent vesicostomy, and supravesical diversion.
Indwelling catheterization, augmentation cystoplasty, or other urinary diversions are rare long-term management strategies for OAB and should only be taken into account after all other medical and surgical options have been exhausted and only after careful consideration of the likely benefits and risks (Evidence strength Grade D).
Detrusor hyper-reflexia as a factor in spontaneous perforation of augmentation cystoplasty for neuropathic bladder.