auditory hallucination


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hallucination

 [hah-loo″sĭ-na´shun]
a sensory impression (sight, touch, sound, smell, or taste) that has no basis in external stimulation. Hallucinations can have psychologic causes, as in mental illness, or they can result from drugs, alcohol, organic illnesses, such as brain tumor or senility, or exhaustion. When hallucinations have a psychologic origin, they usually represent a disguised form of a repressed conflict. adj. adj hallu´cinative, hallu´cinatory.
auditory hallucination a hallucination of hearing; the most common type.
gustatory hallucination a hallucination of taste.
haptic hallucination tactile hallucination.
hypnagogic hallucination a vivid, dreamlike hallucination occurring at sleep onset.
hypnopompic hallucination a vivid, dreamlike hallucination occurring on awakening.
kinesthetic hallucination a hallucination involving the sense of bodily movement.
olfactory hallucination a hallucination of smell.
somatic hallucination a hallucination involving the perception of a physical experience occurring within the body.
tactile hallucination a hallucination of touch.
visual hallucination a hallucination of sight.

au·di·to·ry hal·lu·ci·na·tion

a symptom frequently a part of or a frequent symptom in a schizophrenic or psychotic mood disorder that, in the absence of an external source, consists of hearing a voice or other auditory stimulus that other people do not perceive.

auditory hallucination

Etymology: L, audire, to hear, alucinari, a wandering mind
commonly seen in schizophrenia. It is a subjective experience of hearing voices or other sounds despite the absence of an actual reality-based external stimulus to account for the phenomenon.

auditory hallucination

A hallucination involving the perception of sounds arising from outside of the head, most commonly of voices, in absence of auditory stimuli, which may occur in absence of psychosis or mental illness.

Aetiology
Brainstem lesions—e.g., post-stroke, tumours, encephalitis, infection and abscesses.

au·di·to·ry hal·lu·ci·na·tion

(awdi-tōr-ē hă-lūsi-nāshŭn)
Symptom commonly seen in a schizophrenic or psychotic mood disorder patients that, in the absence of an external source, consists of hearing a voice or other auditory stimulus that other people do not perceive.
References in periodicals archive ?
Objective: To investigate the efficacy and safety of tDCS for auditory hallucinations among patients with schizophrenia.
The obs ervation that voices are knowledgeable about patients suggests that auditory hallucinations are linked to memory.
Auditory hallucinations, source monitoring, and the belief that "voices" are real.
The area treated was a region in the left temporal parietal lobe area that previously had been identified as being involved in auditory hallucinations by positron emission tomography.
It compensates for the presence of auditory hallucinations, caused by a defect in self-recognition, by writing a narrative to account for them.
General diagnostic criteria of schizophrenia imposed by ICD 10 plead for the presence of a continuous symptom or two or more symptoms within the first four criteria if such symptoms are vague (thought echo, insertion, thought broadcasting, delusional perception and delusions of control; influence or passivity; auditory hallucinations of voices commenting the patient; persistent inadequate delusions of other kinds) or at least two symptoms of the last five diagnostic groups (persistent hallucinations accompanied by delusions--which may be fleeting or half-formed--, breaks or interpolations in the train of thought, catatonic behaviour, negative symptoms, significant and intense alteration in the global functionality of the patient), for at least a month.
But Zak and Lisa are stunned when Belle confesses that she made up her auditory hallucinations.
He has been diagnosed with psychosis by the hospital and has been taken medication to battle visual and auditory hallucinations.
Among those with psychoses, visual and auditory hallucinations are most common.
Threat preys on your senses (and phobias) at every opportunity - from auditory hallucinations to vertigo and acrophobia.
Among the topics are near-psychotic phenomena in a clinical context, at-risk mental states, auditory hallucinations, delusions, language disorder, and a phenomenology-based approach to disturbances of the experience of self.