auditory hallucination


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

hallucination

 [hah-loo″sĭ-na´shun]
a sensory impression (sight, touch, sound, smell, or taste) that has no basis in external stimulation. Hallucinations can have psychologic causes, as in mental illness, or they can result from drugs, alcohol, organic illnesses, such as brain tumor or senility, or exhaustion. When hallucinations have a psychologic origin, they usually represent a disguised form of a repressed conflict. adj. adj hallu´cinative, hallu´cinatory.
auditory hallucination a hallucination of hearing; the most common type.
gustatory hallucination a hallucination of taste.
haptic hallucination tactile hallucination.
hypnagogic hallucination a vivid, dreamlike hallucination occurring at sleep onset.
hypnopompic hallucination a vivid, dreamlike hallucination occurring on awakening.
kinesthetic hallucination a hallucination involving the sense of bodily movement.
olfactory hallucination a hallucination of smell.
somatic hallucination a hallucination involving the perception of a physical experience occurring within the body.
tactile hallucination a hallucination of touch.
visual hallucination a hallucination of sight.

au·di·to·ry hal·lu·ci·na·tion

a symptom frequently a part of or a frequent symptom in a schizophrenic or psychotic mood disorder that, in the absence of an external source, consists of hearing a voice or other auditory stimulus that other people do not perceive.

auditory hallucination

A hallucination involving the perception of sounds arising from outside of the head, most commonly of voices, in absence of auditory stimuli, which may occur in absence of psychosis or mental illness.

Aetiology
Brainstem lesions—e.g., post-stroke, tumours, encephalitis, infection and abscesses.

au·di·to·ry hal·lu·ci·na·tion

(awdi-tōr-ē hă-lūsi-nāshŭn)
Symptom commonly seen in a schizophrenic or psychotic mood disorder patients that, in the absence of an external source, consists of hearing a voice or other auditory stimulus that other people do not perceive.
References in periodicals archive ?
Overall, studies using auditory hallucinations simulations found that the simulations were effective in changing the attitudes and/or empathy of participants (Dearing & Steadman, 2009; Galletly & Burton, 2011; Hamilton Wilson et al., 2009; Kidd, Tusaie, Morgan, Preebe, & Garrett, 2015; Skoy, Eukel, Frenzel, Werremeyer, & McDaniel, 2016).
I will pursue a view of auditory hallucinations as essentially perceptual phenomena, and that a speech perception model has a better fit with the clinical level than a speech production model.
Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasion brain stimulation which has been suggested as a safe and promising treatment for antipsychotic-refractory auditory hallucinations in patients with schizophrenia.
Auditory hallucinations, source monitoring, and the belief that "voices" are real.
He had continuously experienced auditory hallucinations that criticized and insulted him.
Specifically, we focused on the frequency and duration of auditory hallucinations in a case of schizo-affective disorder.
There's no love lost between Mike and musical genius Brian, who has diagnosed mental health conditions, and is said to have suffered auditory hallucinations since 1965 due to drug use.
A 30-year-old Caucasian female was admitted to our inpatient psychiatric unit with severe depression and active psychosis in the form of paranoia and command auditory hallucinations. Medical history was obtained from the patient and a reliable collateral historian, the patient's mother.
"I think the clinical impact we see here is that for patients with hallucinations, and particularly auditory hallucinations, antipsychotic discontinuation should be done very, very cautiously because they do have a very high risk of relapse," Anjali Patel, DO, said at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2016.
Most commonly, hallucinations are auditory (Keltner & Steele, 2015) and are often described as "hearing voices." Auditory hallucinations may be rather benign or may be a frightening experience for the patient, and they can be associated at times with periods of increased anxiety (Townsend, 2015).