audiologist


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

audiologist

 [aw″de-ol´o-jist]
an allied health professional specializing in audiology, who provides services that include evaluation of hearing function to detect hearing impairment and, if there is a hearing disorder, to determine the anatomical site involved and its cause; selection of appropriate hearing aids; and training in lip reading, hearing aid use, and maintenance of normal speech.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

au·di·ol·o·gist

(aw'dē-ol'ōjist),
A specialist in evaluation and rehabilitation of patients whose communication disorders stem in whole or in part from hearing impairment.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

audiologist

A healthcare professional trained to identify and measure hearing impairments and related disorders—e.g., balance or vestibular disorders and tinnitus—and rehabilitate patients with impaired hearing and related disorders.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

audiologist

Audiology A non-MD health care professional trained to identify and measure hearing impairment and related disorders–eg, balance or vestibular disorders and tinnitus, and rehabilitate Pts with impaired hearing and related disorders; audiologists use various tests and procedures to assess hearing and balance Salary $52K + 6% bonus. See Speech pathology.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

au·di·ol·o·gist

(aw'dē-ol'ŏ-jist)
A specialist in evaluation and rehabilitation of those whose communication disorders center in whole or in part in the hearing function.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

audiologist

A specialist in the diagnosis and treatment of defects of hearing.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Audiologist

A person with a degree and/or certification in the areas of identification and measurement of hearing impairments and rehabilitation of those with hearing problems.
Mentioned in: Hearing Aids
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

au·di·ol·o·gist

(aw'dē-ol'ŏ-jist)
A specialist in evaluation and rehabilitation of patients whose communication disorders stem in whole or in part from hearing impairment.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The third option for practice owners who wish to introduce audiology can be described as 'going it alone.' Managing director of Bayfields Opticians and Audiologists, Royston Bayfield, introduced audiology into his group in October last year.
"And then work with an audiologist to see what's going to work best for you based on your lifestyle, budget, and communication needs," he continues.
The role of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences in the Health System is new and faces adversities, such as the lack of training for acting on primary care, lack of knowledge by SUS on the possibilities of speech-language pathologist and audiologist's actions in this context, in addition to a repressed demand for Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, which led to the choice of focusing on clinical intervention at the basic level of healthcare services [22].
By offering highly professional and unique services to the marketplace, audiologists are signaling to consumers that their value is well beyond the delivery of traditional hearing aids.
Patients then met with an audiologist from the respective group (UC or PATM) to which they were randomized.
Jyoti Bhayani, a certified audiologist at Gottlieb Memorial Hospital, part of Loyola University Health System, said that once hearing is damaged, it cannot be repaired.
Each set of earphones is custom moulded from medical grade 40 Shore silicone following an individual fitting by an audiologist.
Nicole Choules, along with clinical audiologist Kimball Forbes.
Those differences have to be considered by the person, his/her physician, and audiologist. The nature of the loss--the frequency range involved, the degree of the hearing loss and whether one or both ears are affected also must be factored in.
* The medical team's views on audiological EI practices, with specific reference to age of diagnosis and age at which a child should receive amplification, team management, and referral to an audiologist.
Historically, the role of the deployed Army Audiologist (Area of Concentration 72C), involved a predominately direct clinical care mission.
Once the ear anatomy has been thoroughly checked then the doctor usually refers the child to an audiologist. Audiologists specialize in the anatomy of the ear and its functions.