audiology

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audiology

 [aw″de-ol´o-je]
the science concerned with the sense of hearing, especially in the evaluation and measurement of hearing loss and the rehabilitation of those with impaired hearing. See also audiologist.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

au·di·ol·o·gy

(aw'dē-ol'ō-jē),
1. The study of hearing disorders through the identification and measurement of hearing impairment.
2. The rehabilitation of persons with hearing impairments.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

audiology

(ô′dē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The study of hearing, especially hearing defects and their treatment.

au′di·o·log′i·cal (-ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
au′di·ol′o·gist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

audiology

The formal study of hearing, hearing loss, balance and other disorders affecting the vestibulocochlear (8th cranial, acoustic) nerve.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

audiology

The study of hearing
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

au·di·ol·o·gy

(aw'dē-ol'ŏ-jē)
The study of hearing disorders through the identification and measurement of functional hearing loss as well as the rehabilitation of persons with hearing impairments.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

audiology

The scientific study of hearing and of the medical management of hearing defects.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

au·di·ol·o·gy

(aw'dē-ol'ŏ-jē)
1. Study of hearing disorders through identification and measurement of hearing impairment.
2. Rehabilitation of patients with hearing impairments.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
People who are audiologically deaf perceive themselves as "people who are deaf," use English (or another language used by hearing people) as their native language, whether signed (e.g., signed English) or spoken, participate in organizations and community networks which consist primarily of hearing people, and have typically developed an identity as hearing people through early personal, educational, and social experience.
In the Deaf community, it is standard practice to differentiate between cutlturally identified (D)eaf and audiologically (d)eaf persons and institutions.
Though the exposure was only 2 -3 years, nicotine affects the cochlear outer hair cells, even though the patients are clinically and audiologically normal.
Because of the transient nature of the hearing loss in TAD, it has not been possible to audiologically evaluate the nature of the hearing loss.
(3,4) Audiologically, cerumen occlusion adversely affects audiometric test results in some cases and prevents testing in others.