audiogram

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audiogram

 [aw´de-o-gram″]
1. a graphic record of the findings by audiometry.
2. the hearing test done by audiometry; it tests the ability to hear pure tones in each ear. A careful and complete audiogram will test both bone conduction and air conduction. A comparison between these two types of conduction can be useful in localizing which part of the hearing mechanism is responsible for any hearing loss: if the loss is due to a problem with the portion of the middle ear that conducts sound from the ear canal to the inner ear, it is a conductive hearing loss; if it is due to the inner ear or the nerve that conducts sound signals to the brain, it is a sensorineural hearing loss. The results of audiograms are usually displayed in graph form; the amount of hearing is tested at different sound frequencies (measured in hertz). Most audiograms go from around 250 hertz to 4000 hertz. Lack of hearing at below 20 decibels on the graph is within the normal range; lack of hearing at above 20 decibels is considered abnormal.

The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association has published guidelines for audiologic screening, which are available at their web site: http://www.asha.com. In addition, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, part of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, has recommendations on screening for hearing impairment and notes that there is good evidence that screening of newborns leads to earlier identification and treatment. The recommendations are available through the agency's web site: http://www.ahcpr.gov.

au·di·o·gram

(aw'dē-ō-gram),
The graphic record drawn from the results of hearing tests with an audiometer, which charts the threshold of hearing at various frequencies against sound intensity in decibels.
[audio- + G. gramma, a drawing]

audiogram

(ô′dē-ə-grăm′)
n.
1. A graphic record of hearing ability for various sound frequencies that is used to measure hearing loss.
2. The procedure performed to produce such a record.

audiogram

[ô′dē·əgram′]
Etymology: Gk, audire + gramma, record
a chart showing the faintest level at which an individual is able to detect sounds of various frequencies, usually in octaves from 125 Hz to 8000 Hz. See also audiometry.

audiogram

A recording of hearing measured over a range of sound frequencies, usually from 100 Hz to 800 Hz. The audiogram is a plot of tone intensity in decibels on the vertical axis (0 to 80 dB) and frequency on the horizontal axis (250 to 4000 Hz). The sensation of sound results from the transmission of vibrations at a certain frequency—sound waves—which pass through air (air conduction) and craniofacial bones (bone conduction).

audiogram

Audiology A test in which hearing is measured over a range of sound frequencies. See Pure tone audiometry.

au·di·o·gram

(aw'dē-ō-gram)
The graphic record drawn from the results of hearing tests with the audiometer; charts the threshold of hearing at various frequencies against sound intensity in decibels.
[L. audio, to hear + G. gramma, a drawing]

audiogram

A record of the sensitivity, or threshold, of hearing at different frequencies.

Audiogram

A chart or graph of the results of a hearing test conducted with audiographic equipment. The chart reflects the softest (lowest volume) sounds that can be heard at various frequencies or pitches.
Mentioned in: Audiometry

au·di·o·gram

(aw'dē-ō-gram)
The graphic record drawn from the results of hearing tests with the audiometer.
[L. audio, to hear + G. gramma, a drawing]

audiogram (ô´dēəgram),

n a graphic summary of the measurement of hearing loss showing the number of decibels lost at each frequency tested.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conclusions: Idiopathic BSSHL is a relatively rare subtype of SSHL with a higher rate of descending audiogram type and inferior hearing outcome rather than being classified as a completely different disease entity compared to USSHL.
We collected data from medical records of patients who were treated with ITD for acute tinnitus, either induced by noise or of unknown cause, and analyzed the treatment outcomes over a relatively long-term follow-up period until the final questionnaires and audiogram were completed.
Among the 432 patients with a predeployment audiogram, 115 (25% of the 456 cohort total) had already developed an STS compared to their reference audiograms.
However, this inference was strengthened by studying exposed workers and excluding audiograms indicating nonoccupational exposures.
Data are collected in SPL and converted to show conventional frequency thresholds in decibels hearing level (HL) in order to be consistent with a typical clinical audiogram.
Out of the 32 pathological audiograms, notched configuration was seen in 16 (50%), slope configuration in 13 (40.
Monitoring audiograms (hearing tests) typically is done without noise rest to determine if the hearing of a noise-exposed individual is being affected.
Bessette also suggests tracking occupational noise exposure histories in employee personnel records to help audiologists interpret employee audiograms.
Requires personnel assigned to work noise hazardous areas to be enrolled in the hearing conservation program and to receive annual audiograms, beginning within the year of being assigned to work in the environment.
Pre-placement physicals, DOT physicals, pre-placement functional evaluations, executive physicals, drug screens, hair testing, random drug testing, testcup, alcohol screens, pulmonary function testing, audiograms, fit testing, adult immunizations, PPD testing, blood panels, IME, PPI rating, employee assistance program, CPR training and first aid training.
Pre- and postconcert audiograms were compared, and the data were analyzed using a multinomial probability model to determine audiogram frequency test-retest variability.
Popular add-ons include exercise stress test, sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy and audiograms, according to James Casanova, MD, CPE, FACPE, associate dean, clinical affairs, Medical College of Wisconsin Physician Practice.