audiogram

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audiogram

 [aw´de-o-gram″]
1. a graphic record of the findings by audiometry.
2. the hearing test done by audiometry; it tests the ability to hear pure tones in each ear. A careful and complete audiogram will test both bone conduction and air conduction. A comparison between these two types of conduction can be useful in localizing which part of the hearing mechanism is responsible for any hearing loss: if the loss is due to a problem with the portion of the middle ear that conducts sound from the ear canal to the inner ear, it is a conductive hearing loss; if it is due to the inner ear or the nerve that conducts sound signals to the brain, it is a sensorineural hearing loss. The results of audiograms are usually displayed in graph form; the amount of hearing is tested at different sound frequencies (measured in hertz). Most audiograms go from around 250 hertz to 4000 hertz. Lack of hearing at below 20 decibels on the graph is within the normal range; lack of hearing at above 20 decibels is considered abnormal.

The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association has published guidelines for audiologic screening, which are available at their web site: http://www.asha.com. In addition, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, part of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, has recommendations on screening for hearing impairment and notes that there is good evidence that screening of newborns leads to earlier identification and treatment. The recommendations are available through the agency's web site: http://www.ahcpr.gov.

au·di·o·gram

(aw'dē-ō-gram),
The graphic record drawn from the results of hearing tests with an audiometer, which charts the threshold of hearing at various frequencies against sound intensity in decibels.
[audio- + G. gramma, a drawing]

audiogram

(ô′dē-ə-grăm′)
n.
1. A graphic record of hearing ability for various sound frequencies that is used to measure hearing loss.
2. The procedure performed to produce such a record.

audiogram

[ô′dē·əgram′]
Etymology: Gk, audire + gramma, record
a chart showing the faintest level at which an individual is able to detect sounds of various frequencies, usually in octaves from 125 Hz to 8000 Hz. See also audiometry.

audiogram

A recording of hearing measured over a range of sound frequencies, usually from 100 Hz to 800 Hz. The audiogram is a plot of tone intensity in decibels on the vertical axis (0 to 80 dB) and frequency on the horizontal axis (250 to 4000 Hz). The sensation of sound results from the transmission of vibrations at a certain frequency—sound waves—which pass through air (air conduction) and craniofacial bones (bone conduction).

audiogram

Audiology A test in which hearing is measured over a range of sound frequencies. See Pure tone audiometry.

au·di·o·gram

(aw'dē-ō-gram)
The graphic record drawn from the results of hearing tests with the audiometer; charts the threshold of hearing at various frequencies against sound intensity in decibels.
[L. audio, to hear + G. gramma, a drawing]

audiogram

A record of the sensitivity, or threshold, of hearing at different frequencies.

Audiogram

A chart or graph of the results of a hearing test conducted with audiographic equipment. The chart reflects the softest (lowest volume) sounds that can be heard at various frequencies or pitches.
Mentioned in: Audiometry

au·di·o·gram

(aw'dē-ō-gram)
The graphic record drawn from the results of hearing tests with the audiometer.
[L. audio, to hear + G. gramma, a drawing]

audiogram (ô´dēəgram),

n a graphic summary of the measurement of hearing loss showing the number of decibels lost at each frequency tested.
References in periodicals archive ?
When the preoperative bone-conduction audiograms were compared with the postoperative bone-conduction audiograms done within 24 hours of surgery, the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant, although it was close to it (p = 0.
The inclusion criteria were age 15-80 years and having had a formal audiogram performed by a trained audiologist at Groote Schuur Hospital in the previous 2 weeks.
A "screen failure" follow-up audiogram indicated the hearing shift was confined to the ultra-high frequencies in one ear.
The Safety Department has determined that there are Sailors from six departments who require audiograms each year: Air, Engineering, Deck, Weapons, Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance and Reactor," Marks said.
Figures 1 and 2 show the better-ear and worse-ear average audiograms by age group.
1985) talked about some cases in which children with CRS whose audiograms and speech patterns had been normal suddenly developed mild to profound sensorineural hearing loss.
A worker who wears properly fitted hearing protectors and participates in annual audiograms can feel well protected.
This program included fundoscopic examinations of the eye, regular blood glucose measurements, antibody testing, electrocardiograms, echocardiograms, abdominal and pelvic ultrasounds, audiograms, and extensive laboratory assessments.
The company's in-house audiologists and dispensers will also custom-program devices for users who send their audiograms to Eargo.
All good programs involve health professionals conducting audiograms to monitor the hearing of individuals working in noisy areas.
Subsequent audiograms over the next several weeks showed a gradual recovery of hearing in the left ear (figure 4).
Figure 2 presents the average pre- and postdeployment audiograms for the 56 OTE TCAPS users.