audiogram

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audiogram

 [aw´de-o-gram″]
1. a graphic record of the findings by audiometry.
2. the hearing test done by audiometry; it tests the ability to hear pure tones in each ear. A careful and complete audiogram will test both bone conduction and air conduction. A comparison between these two types of conduction can be useful in localizing which part of the hearing mechanism is responsible for any hearing loss: if the loss is due to a problem with the portion of the middle ear that conducts sound from the ear canal to the inner ear, it is a conductive hearing loss; if it is due to the inner ear or the nerve that conducts sound signals to the brain, it is a sensorineural hearing loss. The results of audiograms are usually displayed in graph form; the amount of hearing is tested at different sound frequencies (measured in hertz). Most audiograms go from around 250 hertz to 4000 hertz. Lack of hearing at below 20 decibels on the graph is within the normal range; lack of hearing at above 20 decibels is considered abnormal.

The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association has published guidelines for audiologic screening, which are available at their web site: http://www.asha.com. In addition, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, part of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, has recommendations on screening for hearing impairment and notes that there is good evidence that screening of newborns leads to earlier identification and treatment. The recommendations are available through the agency's web site: http://www.ahcpr.gov.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

au·di·o·gram

(aw'dē-ō-gram),
The graphic record drawn from the results of hearing tests with an audiometer, which charts the threshold of hearing at various frequencies against sound intensity in decibels.
[audio- + G. gramma, a drawing]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

audiogram

(ô′dē-ə-grăm′)
n.
1. A graphic record of hearing ability for various sound frequencies that is used to measure hearing loss.
2. The procedure performed to produce such a record.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

audiogram

A recording of hearing measured over a range of sound frequencies, usually from 100 Hz to 800 Hz. The audiogram is a plot of tone intensity in decibels on the vertical axis (0 to 80 dB) and frequency on the horizontal axis (250 to 4000 Hz). The sensation of sound results from the transmission of vibrations at a certain frequency—sound waves—which pass through air (air conduction) and craniofacial bones (bone conduction).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

audiogram

Audiology A test in which hearing is measured over a range of sound frequencies. See Pure tone audiometry.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

au·di·o·gram

(aw'dē-ō-gram)
The graphic record drawn from the results of hearing tests with the audiometer; charts the threshold of hearing at various frequencies against sound intensity in decibels.
[L. audio, to hear + G. gramma, a drawing]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

audiogram

A record of the sensitivity, or threshold, of hearing at different frequencies.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Audiogram

A chart or graph of the results of a hearing test conducted with audiographic equipment. The chart reflects the softest (lowest volume) sounds that can be heard at various frequencies or pitches.
Mentioned in: Audiometry
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

au·di·o·gram

(aw'dē-ō-gram)
The graphic record drawn from the results of hearing tests with the audiometer.
[L. audio, to hear + G. gramma, a drawing]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Pre-, post-treatment, and follow-up pure tone audiometry (PTA) was recorded analyzing the severity of hearing loss, audiogram curve morphology, and hearing recovery.
Audiogram types were compared based on the hearing gains achieved with each treatment method and recovery status (audiogram types are shown in Figure 1).
The history of noise/blast exposure, the onset of symptoms directly after noise/blast exposure, symmetrical hearing before acoustic trauma documented with audiograms directed initial diagnosis towards AAT, however, of an atypical course.
After adjusting for differences in demographics, the data support the finding that BSSHL is a relatively rare subtype of SSHL with more descending audiograms, inferior hearing outcomes, less chances of comorbid dyslipidemia, higher rates of preceding viral infections, and a lower level of immune markers, rather than a completely different disease entity compared to USSHL.
The severity of tinnitus (THI) in terms of patients' sex, age, audiogram type, and hearing loss level was studied by Ridit analysis.
Comparison of the audiograms of IV: 1 (6 years of age) and II: 5 (57 years of age) revealed that II: 5 had a better hearing threshold at 250 Hz and 500 Hz.
A greater percentage of blast-exposed patients had developed an STS between their reference and subsequent audiograms than nonblast patients, but this difference was just shy of being statistically significant (P=.06) at the alpha level of 0.05.
The final sample included 1,413,789 audiograms for workers employed by 25,908 U.S.
Figure 1 demonstrates that the majority of the sample (67%) had from one to three audiograms in the DOEHRS-DR.
The inclusion criteria were age 15-80 years and having had a formal audiogram performed by a trained audiologist at Groote Schuur Hospital in the previous 2 weeks.
Hearing impairment in the high frequency range is considered an unfavorable factor, whereas a low to middle frequency audiogram contour is associated with an increased likelihood of recovery.
Hearing assessment was by pure tone audiograms in accordance with the British Society of Audiology recommended procedure (2004).