audiogram


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Related to audiogram: pure tone audiogram

audiogram

 [aw´de-o-gram″]
1. a graphic record of the findings by audiometry.
2. the hearing test done by audiometry; it tests the ability to hear pure tones in each ear. A careful and complete audiogram will test both bone conduction and air conduction. A comparison between these two types of conduction can be useful in localizing which part of the hearing mechanism is responsible for any hearing loss: if the loss is due to a problem with the portion of the middle ear that conducts sound from the ear canal to the inner ear, it is a conductive hearing loss; if it is due to the inner ear or the nerve that conducts sound signals to the brain, it is a sensorineural hearing loss. The results of audiograms are usually displayed in graph form; the amount of hearing is tested at different sound frequencies (measured in hertz). Most audiograms go from around 250 hertz to 4000 hertz. Lack of hearing at below 20 decibels on the graph is within the normal range; lack of hearing at above 20 decibels is considered abnormal.

The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association has published guidelines for audiologic screening, which are available at their web site: http://www.asha.com. In addition, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, part of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, has recommendations on screening for hearing impairment and notes that there is good evidence that screening of newborns leads to earlier identification and treatment. The recommendations are available through the agency's web site: http://www.ahcpr.gov.

au·di·o·gram

(aw'dē-ō-gram),
The graphic record drawn from the results of hearing tests with an audiometer, which charts the threshold of hearing at various frequencies against sound intensity in decibels.
[audio- + G. gramma, a drawing]

audiogram

(ô′dē-ə-grăm′)
n.
1. A graphic record of hearing ability for various sound frequencies that is used to measure hearing loss.
2. The procedure performed to produce such a record.

audiogram

A recording of hearing measured over a range of sound frequencies, usually from 100 Hz to 800 Hz. The audiogram is a plot of tone intensity in decibels on the vertical axis (0 to 80 dB) and frequency on the horizontal axis (250 to 4000 Hz). The sensation of sound results from the transmission of vibrations at a certain frequency—sound waves—which pass through air (air conduction) and craniofacial bones (bone conduction).

audiogram

Audiology A test in which hearing is measured over a range of sound frequencies. See Pure tone audiometry.

au·di·o·gram

(aw'dē-ō-gram)
The graphic record drawn from the results of hearing tests with the audiometer; charts the threshold of hearing at various frequencies against sound intensity in decibels.
[L. audio, to hear + G. gramma, a drawing]

audiogram

A record of the sensitivity, or threshold, of hearing at different frequencies.

Audiogram

A chart or graph of the results of a hearing test conducted with audiographic equipment. The chart reflects the softest (lowest volume) sounds that can be heard at various frequencies or pitches.
Mentioned in: Audiometry

au·di·o·gram

(aw'dē-ō-gram)
The graphic record drawn from the results of hearing tests with the audiometer.
[L. audio, to hear + G. gramma, a drawing]
References in periodicals archive ?
Audiograms with sensorineural hearing loss were divided according to the degree of hearing loss, audiometric configurations and unilateral / bilateral hearing impairment.
An audiogram provides a foundation for determining one's hearing abilities.
If doctor requires graphical output, program must be able to show audiogram and also save it into the file.
The 3000-8000 Hz dip in audiogram which indicates the sign of noise-induced hearing loss was more prominent among Garage II workers.
The prevalence of notched audiograms was considerably higher than the one reported by the studies on the general population but was around the same level or lower than that reported from the studies of "traditional" music courses and conservatoires.
Hearing loss in 8082-II:1 (Figure 1, female/5 yo) was initially detected at 5 yo with a ski-slope audiogram. Her parents had noticed occasional poor hearing since she was 3yo.
Staging of this disease is based on the four-tone average of the audiogram of the affected side.[sup][3] The average thresholds for Stage 1 to Stage 4 were ≤25 dB HL, 26-40 dB HL, 41-70 dB HL, and >70 dB HL, respectively.
The audiogram obtained for majority of patients at first visit (82%) was right sloping audiogram.
This criterion reduced the number of audiogram pairs to 744,553, which is about 75 percent of the original participant pool.
Bunch, the first US audiologist), and trends: e.g., the development of the pure-tone audiogram, early detection of hearing disorders, auditory processing disorder in children and adults those with apparently normal hearing, and tinnitus evaluation and therapy.
They press a button to show when they have heard something and results are shown on a graph or audiogram.
At baseline, participants had a medical examination, an audiogram, and an assessment of fall risk, balance, gait, positional vertigo, and oculomotor function.