atypical nevus

(redirected from atypical mole)

atypical nevus

(1) Dysplastic naevus, see there.
(2) Any naevus with atypical features, often looked for as a sign of potential malignancy.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

atypical nevus

Dermatology A pigmented lesion with a clinical appearance that differs from a 'garden variety' mole, which may be larger, have irregular borders, lack uniformity of color; it can be flat or raised above the skin surface. See Nevus.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is typically done short term, over the course of 3-4 months, or longer term, over a period of 6 months to years, with long-term SDI being reserved for monitoring of less suspicious lesions, often in patients with an atypical mole syndrome.
"People who have lots of unusually shaped or large moles - known as atypical mole syndrome - have a higher risk of melanoma than the general population," explains Mr Ghazavi.
AN ATYPICAL MOLE ON THE LEFT CALF was brought to the attention of a primary care physician by a 36-year-old man during a full physical.
Melanoma can develop from atypical moles. The risk of an atypical mole becoming a melanoma is estimated to be 1 in 200,000.
>5mm diameter, sometimes having flat and raised areas and oval rather than round or often with some colour variation) is described by the British Association of Dermatologists (BAD) as 'atypical mole syndrome' (BAD 2016).
A child with atypical nevi who has two immediate relatives with a history of melanoma may have familial atypical mole syndrome.
She cited the case of a 64-year-old patient who desired a p16 genetic test because of a personal history of melanoma and atypical mole syndrome.
The mole at far right shows an atypical mole with pre-cancerous changes - while it would have been uneven in shape, texture and colour initially, the patient may have noticed some new growth or colour changes.
Regardless, dermatologists should always do complete skin examinations and follow up any atypical moles, Pampena stressed.
In general, normal moles, those small, brown "beauty marks" that appear on almost everyone to some extent, are less concerning than atypical moles, which may actually resemble a melanoma in appearance.
Risk factors for skin cancers include fair skin, increasing age, numerous and/or atypical moles, precancerous skin lesions, a history of excessive sun exposure, a family or personal history of skin cancer, the use of tanning devices, sunny climates, a weakened immune system and prior exposure to toxins or x-ray treatment.

Full browser ?